orienting reflex


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or·i·ent·ing re·flex

an aspect of attending in which an organism's initial response to a change or to a novel stimulus is such that the organism becomes more sensitive to the stimulation; for example, dilation of the pupil of the eye in response to dim light.

orienting reflex

(ôr′ē-ən-tĭng, -ĕn′-)
n.
An aspect of responding to environmental stimuli in which an organism's initial response to a change or novel stimulus makes the organism more sensitive to the stimulation, as when the pupil of the eye dilates in response to dim light.

or·i·ent·ing re·flex

(ōr'ē-en-ting rē'fleks)
An aspect of attending in which an organism's initial response to a change or to a novel stimulus is such that the organism becomes more sensitive to the stimulation (e.g., dilation of the pupil of the eye in response to dim light).
Synonym(s): orienting response.
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References in periodicals archive ?
First, in cognitive terms, people telling lies about a crime they have committed recognize crime-related information and stimuli, so they show an orienting response, also called an orienting reflex, which is a reflective response that occurs when a novel or important stimulus is presented (Sokolov, 1963).
Our past research has shown that the development of all the types of internal inhibition Pavlov identified, as well as the extinction of the orienting reflex to a new stimulus, are accompanied by increased amplitude of total slow wave potentials, of background and secondary evoked potentials and of the corresponding phasic activity of neurons (alternation of activation and inhibition of impulses) either locally in the projection areas of the conditioned stimuli, or, as extinguishing inhibition gets stronger, throughout the entire cerebral cortex.
And from what they have computed, surprise may also explain the reason behind the "orienting reflex", whereby our attention is caught by novel stimuli.
Based on Sokolov (1963) and Lacey (1967), the orienting reflex is assumed to functionally influence perceptual thresholds in facilitating the processing of information about the external environment; it is therefore most plausible that stimuli that induce an orienting response have the potency to impair performance (Filion, Dawson, Schell, & Hazlett, 1991).
In the chapter dealing with precognition, we are introduced to Radin's own groundbreaking research which he calls "presentiment." In these experiments, participants are monitored for the physiological signs of the "orienting reflex," which is the body's unconscious reaction to a potentially threatening situation.