orientation

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orientation

 [o″re-en-ta´shun]
1. awareness of one's environment, with reference to place, time, and people.
2. attraction or tendency.
3. the relative positions of atoms or groups in chemical compounds.
4. a planned series of classes and educational experiences on patient care units to acquaint a newly employed health care provider with routines, protocols, and expectations.
reality orientation see reality orientation.
topographical orientation determination of the location of objects and settings and the route to the location.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-en-tā'shŭn),
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to another atom to which it is connected, that is, the direction of the bond connecting them.
[Fr. orienter, to set toward the east, therefore in a definite position]

orientation

/ori·en·ta·tion/ (or″e-en-ta´shun)
1. awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and people.
2. the relative positions of atoms or groups in a chemical compound.

orientation

(ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən, -ən-)
n.
1. The act of orienting or the state of being oriented.
2. Sexual orientation.
3.
a. An adjustment or adaptation to a new environment, situation, custom, or set of ideas.
b. Introductory instruction concerning a new situation: orientation for incoming students.
4. Psychology Awareness of the objective world in relation to one's self.

orientation

[ôr′ē·əntā′shən]
Etymology: L, oriens + itio, process
1 the direction of a fragment of nucleic acid inserted into a vector. The orientation of the fragment may be the same as that of the genetic map of the vector (the n orientation) or opposite (the u orientation).
2 the awareness of one's physical environment with regard to time, place, and the identity of other people; the ability to adapt to such an existing or new environment. Disorientation is usually a symptom of organic brain disease and most psychoses.

orientation

Neurology The state of being oriented; the knowledge of one's self, and present situation–eg,  awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and interpersonal relationships Vox populi Proclivity, tendency; mien. See Sexual orientation.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to one to which it is connected.

orientation

  1. The response of an organism in taking up a particular position in relation to a particular stimulus.
  2. see NAVIGATION.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.

orientation,

n the ability to correctly place oneself in time, space, and relationship to others and one's work and environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, athletes with high ego orientation tend to demonstrate less concern for "the process of competitive sport" than their low ego-oriented counterparts (Duda et.
A high ego orientation is associated with strong beliefs that superior skills and deceptive strategies lead to success; in this orientation the purpose of sport is to enhance one's social status.
Religious Orientations and Selective Exposure among Fundamentalist Christians.
In other words, the concern of extrinsic religious orientation is only with external matters of the individual and they use religion for their social, cultural, financial and political matters.
This study aimed at exploring the practices relating to designing new employee orientation programs conducted by different organizations in India.
Linking Orientation with Business Strategy and Company Culture
Toros and Duvan (2011) conducted a study in fencers about perceived leadership behaviours, collective efficacy, and goal orientations.
In the light of literature review, marketing orientation seems to be crucial in the context of the impact on the innovativeness of the SMEs sector.
An important factor that influences performance is organizational orientation (market orientation, learning orientation and entrepreneurial orientation).
Stuntz and Weiss (2003) tested Urdan and Maehr's (1995) idea by examining interactions between perceived beliefs of significant others and social orientations as predictors of participants' beliefs about USP.
What individual schools of thought agree on is that market orientation contains the acquisition and distribution of market information.
com/are-gay-rights-under-attack-2020-census-ignore-sexual-orientation-gender-identity-2517444) 2020 Census To Ignore Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity Questions