orientation

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orientation

 [o″re-en-ta´shun]
1. awareness of one's environment, with reference to place, time, and people.
2. attraction or tendency.
3. the relative positions of atoms or groups in chemical compounds.
4. a planned series of classes and educational experiences on patient care units to acquaint a newly employed health care provider with routines, protocols, and expectations.
reality orientation see reality orientation.
topographical orientation determination of the location of objects and settings and the route to the location.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-en-tā'shŭn),
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to another atom to which it is connected, that is, the direction of the bond connecting them.
[Fr. orienter, to set toward the east, therefore in a definite position]

orientation

(ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən, -ən-)
n.
1. The act of orienting or the state of being oriented.
2. Sexual orientation.
3.
a. An adjustment or adaptation to a new environment, situation, custom, or set of ideas.
b. Introductory instruction concerning a new situation: orientation for incoming students.
4. Psychology Awareness of the objective world in relation to one's self.

orientation

Neurology The state of being oriented; the knowledge of one's self, and present situation–eg,  awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and interpersonal relationships Vox populi Proclivity, tendency; mien. See Sexual orientation.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to one to which it is connected.

orientation

  1. The response of an organism in taking up a particular position in relation to a particular stimulus.
  2. see NAVIGATION.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equilibrium orientational states are given by stationary points of F constrained by boundary conditions and the pointwise unit-length constraint on n, with the structural phase of the system (for a given--and boundary conditions) again given by the global minimizer.
Next, assuming uniaxial ordering described by (5), we imposed a distortion to orientational ordering on a characteristic length scale R.
Consider new orientational data Q = Q(t, f, r) with error approximated by the three-dimensional vector
Orientational perspectivism could be qualified as a feature of exact realism, of a Modernist 'counting the streaks of the tulip' (excoriated in Samuel Johnson's Rasselas) or of observing the "halo" of reality in everyday objects in Virginia Woolf's theories of fiction.
Sukhov, "Optically induced spatial charge separation in a nematic and the resultant orientational nonlinearity," Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Vol.
Orientational aspects of a community's language refer to how it is used to orient itself attitudinally to others, and to the presentation content of its own language (Graham, 1999).
We suppose that similar orientational ordering can occur in the LCA film within the molecular area range 119 [[Angstrom].sup.2]/molecule (inflection) to 97 [[Angstrom].sup.2]/molecule (beginning of condensation).
Iribarnegaray, "Orientational changes in dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol Langmuir monolayers," Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol.
As this conceptualisation indicates a change of state caused by downward movement, a term like fallen is coherent with the orientational metaphor SAD IS DOWN if we assume, following Bultnick (1998: 13), that death is generally perceived as an unhappy event.
Orientational bias model of unilateral neglect: evidence from attentional gradients within hemispace.
Finally, the third, relational, element gives the orientational element its content.

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