orientation


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orientation

 [o″re-en-ta´shun]
1. awareness of one's environment, with reference to place, time, and people.
2. attraction or tendency.
3. the relative positions of atoms or groups in chemical compounds.
4. a planned series of classes and educational experiences on patient care units to acquaint a newly employed health care provider with routines, protocols, and expectations.
reality orientation see reality orientation.
topographical orientation determination of the location of objects and settings and the route to the location.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-en-tā'shŭn),
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to another atom to which it is connected, that is, the direction of the bond connecting them.
[Fr. orienter, to set toward the east, therefore in a definite position]

orientation

/ori·en·ta·tion/ (or″e-en-ta´shun)
1. awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and people.
2. the relative positions of atoms or groups in a chemical compound.

orientation

(ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən, -ən-)
n.
1. The act of orienting or the state of being oriented.
2. Sexual orientation.
3.
a. An adjustment or adaptation to a new environment, situation, custom, or set of ideas.
b. Introductory instruction concerning a new situation: orientation for incoming students.
4. Psychology Awareness of the objective world in relation to one's self.

orientation

[ôr′ē·əntā′shən]
Etymology: L, oriens + itio, process
1 the direction of a fragment of nucleic acid inserted into a vector. The orientation of the fragment may be the same as that of the genetic map of the vector (the n orientation) or opposite (the u orientation).
2 the awareness of one's physical environment with regard to time, place, and the identity of other people; the ability to adapt to such an existing or new environment. Disorientation is usually a symptom of organic brain disease and most psychoses.

orientation

Neurology The state of being oriented; the knowledge of one's self, and present situation–eg,  awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and interpersonal relationships Vox populi Proclivity, tendency; mien. See Sexual orientation.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to one to which it is connected.

orientation

  1. The response of an organism in taking up a particular position in relation to a particular stimulus.
  2. see NAVIGATION.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.

orientation,

n the ability to correctly place oneself in time, space, and relationship to others and one's work and environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, there is a significant difference between hockey players with a task goal orientation and an ego orientation.
Our data shows that the ratings are higher for task orientation than for ego orientation.
Ruekert (1992) developed the strategic perspective of market orientation.
There has been many studies embracing different dimensions of market orientation.
The tendency for polymers to experience post-extrusion warpage and distortion from orientation is related to their glass-transition temperatures (Tg).
It shows whether orientation is expected to be a problem, depending on the service temperature expected for the part.
People having this orientation considered their religion to be the most essential feature of their lives.
The data more reveals that accumulative mean score and standard deviation showing the high level presence of extrinsic personal religious orientation among university students.
When asked 'did the orientation link with overall business strategy', two-thirds of the companies replied on the affirmative.
Our non-significant results in gender differences supported the idea that male and female participants of this research perceived similar levels of goal orientation, self-efficacy, and anxiety.
A number of scholars argue that marketing orientation have a negative impact on product innovation and organizational performance, as its consequence is the development of uncompetitive "me-too" products instead of actual innovations (Bennett, Cooper 1981).
Narver and Slater (1990) believe that market orientation promotes a cultural environment where customer satisfaction, service quality and maintaining the distinct needs of clients are top priorities.