oribatid mite

oribatid mite

freeliving, nonparasitic mites, intermediate hosts to tapeworms found in grazing animals, e.g. Moniezia, Anoplocephala, Paranoplocephala, Avitellina spp. Members of the superfamily Oribatoidea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida) fauna of Ethiopia includes little more than 150 species (Ermilov et al.
Research performed in some peat bogs of Lithuania as well as in the Republic of Karelia and the Nizhniy Novgorod Region in Russia showed that oribatid mite communities in such habitats are quite peculiar from both ecological and faunistic points of view (Eitminavichute, 1972; Laskova, 1983; Sidorchuk, 2008).
Coincidentally, the first noticeable appearance of oribatid mite abundances does not occur until c.
Five of the mites were members of the parasitiform order Mesostigmata, and the sixth was an oribatid mite of the family Thyrisomidae.
9:30 NOTES ON EREMAEOZETES ROGERSI, A NEWLY DESCRIBED SPECIES OF ORIBATID MITE (ACARI: ORIBATIDA, EREMAEOZETIDAE) COLLECTED FROM SANDSTONE OUTCROPS IN COFFEE COUNTY, GEORGIA, USA, F.
Oribatid mite fossils from the Upper Devonian of South Mountain, New York and the Lower Carboniferous of County Antrim, Northern Ireland (Acariformes, Oribatida).
The oribatid mite family Eremulidae (Ameroidea) comprises seven genera and 45 species, and has a cosmopolitan distribution (Subias 2004, online version 2011).
The present work is part of a continuing study of the Ethiopian oribatid mite fauna, and focuses on species in the family Scheloribatidae.
Besides the surveys made in Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais, other studies showed that oribatid mites have been found on soybean (G.
His mud cores revealed that around the same time as maize pollen became dominant, the remains of oribatid mites also increased.
The lifecycle of the cestode requires 2 hosts; nonhuman primates are generally the final host, while oribatid mites are the intermediate host, in which the infective cysticercoid of the cestode develops.
Wilson reports, for example, that only one scientist in North America studies the classification of oribatid mites on a full-time bask--although these soil-dwelling arthropods are ubiquitous consumers of humus and fungal spores, and are "therefore key elements of land ecosystems almost everywhere.