organology

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organology

 [or″gah-nol´ŏ-je]
the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

or·ga·nol·o·gy

(ōr'gă-nol'ŏ-jē),
Branch of science concerned with the anatomy, physiology, development, and functions of the various organs.
See also: splanchnology.
[organo- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

organology

(ôr′gə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.
2. The branch of musicology that deals with musical instruments and their construction, acoustic properties, classification, history, and broader cultural context.

or′gan·o·log′ic (ôr′gə-nə-lŏj′ĭk, ôr-găn′ə-), or′gan·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, material evidence is amplified by written sources, and living regional genres also provide immense challenges for the organologist. New evidence is constantly appearing.
Following a comprehensive bibliography, table of abbreviations, and list of library sigla there are four indexes: an alphabetical list of persons depicted; a similar list, but divided into separate categories by profession or musical avocation; an index of the instruments depicted (valuable for the organologist); and finally, a general index of names.
One organologist's analysis of Stradivari's forms using the latter criteria was opposed by another who argued that Stradivari's varying proportions did not follow any mathematical principle but were the result of pragmatism and experimentation.
It is ironic that, at an international conference attended by specialists in instrument construction and preservation, perhaps the strongest impression was made by the distinguished organologist who studiously mangled and dismembered a new instrument, to the cheers of all who watched.
(Institutions that failed to respond to queries are also listed.) Inevitably incomplete, the addresses, telephone numbers, and names of contacts alone make this a candidate for the shelves of every ethnomusicologist, organologist, and sound archivist.
His account of the iconic instrument, the qeej, describes its construction and playing techniques, which will be of great interest to organologists. He offers an account of how the instrument embeds the language of the funeral poems into its polyphonic layers of sound.
The media ecology perspective on culture would surely well serve the organologists, if not simply to bring perspective to the profundity of the shift from pre-electric humanity to our selves.
This trove of raw data cannot easily be read and assimilated, but it is of enormous potential value to organologists, collectors, curators, and music historians.
detail aspects of harpsichords produced from 1680 to 1725 from a variety of makers, including several single-manual instruments; stringed keyboard instruments from the workshops of eighteenth-century maker Ferdinand Weber, including harpsichords, spinets, and pianos; and criteria for the determination of original stringing in historical keyboard instruments, to help curators, organologists, and restorers in identification.
The two papers on Stein illustrate the problems of conservation and restoration confronting curators and organologists. Do we treat the instrument as a (silent) historical document, or do we restore it to a state in which it can be played and heard by performers and visitors?
As a result, people have been identified who were previously unknown to organologists and a broader picture of musical-instrument making is emerging.
Regular readers of VIM (who will recognize some of these pictures), curious players of the trump, and students of folk music will find this extensive, often delightful compilation especially intriguing, but its subject matter should also interest musicologists and ethnomusicologists, art historians and iconographers, organologists, and anyone concerned with northern European and American cultural history.