organology

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organology

 [or″gah-nol´ŏ-je]
the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.

or·ga·nol·o·gy

(ōr'gă-nol'ŏ-jē),
Branch of science concerned with the anatomy, physiology, development, and functions of the various organs.
See also: splanchnology.
[organo- + G. logos, study]

organology

(ôr′gə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.
2. The branch of musicology that deals with musical instruments and their construction, acoustic properties, classification, history, and broader cultural context.

or′gan·o·log′ic (ôr′gə-nə-lŏj′ĭk, ôr-găn′ə-), or′gan·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

organology

the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organological and historical position of the "Coptic lutes" among cordophones are examined in chapter five.
While the title suggests a light narrative on the instrument, the book is in fact a detailed historical, organological, and structural study of the hummel.
The ways in which the information must be structured and the steps be made in order the accomplish the organological detailed designing of the clamping mechanisms are being shown.
Her theories will almost certainly invite continued debate among scholars over bibliographical and organological issues surrounding this early Renaissance music textbook.
Nor are other instruments often confused with the modern guitar such as the Russian seven-string gui-tar, various Portuguese guitars, or the "guitare allemande," all of which stem from different organological backgrounds.
These range widely in approach and topic, and include analytical, historical, organological, and philosophical explorations of Russian and European works and composers.
Jensen has some rueful fun noting the many writers for whom this organological pyre served as a musical metonymy for the whole century she treats.
The author chose to organize the organology section by first addressing general, historical, and regional studies of Spanish instruments, followed with the organological divisions of aerophones, chordophones, idiophones, and membranophones.
For greater depth on organological issues beyond the scope of this book, I refer readers to the articles by Ray Nurse, Joel Dugot, and Michael Lowe in the Proceedings of the International Lute Symposium Utrecht 1986 (ed.
In part I, "The Recorder and Flute in Italy in Vivaldi's Time," Sardelli looks at the social, musical, and organological evidence for the presence of the instruments, both in the country and in Vivaldi's life.
The fifteen chapters are divided into four main areas: the changing social role of the string quartet and organological developments; a history of the most celebrated ensembles; string quartet performance practices--historical and modern; and repertoire, including discussion of modern mixed ensembles involving the string quartet.
This seems unlikely, since Bate's work assumes an organological approach, which is not pursued by Powell.