organic

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organic

 [or-gan´ik]
1. pertaining to an organ or organs.
2. having an organized structure.
3. arising from an organism.
4. pertaining to substances derived from living organisms.
5. denoting chemical substances containing covalently bonded carbon atoms.
6. pertaining to or cultivated by use of animal or vegetable fertilizers, rather than synthetic chemicals.
organic anxiety syndrome a term used in a former system of classification for an organic mental syndrome characterized by prominent, recurrent panic attacks or generalized anxiety caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with delirium. Such disorders are now mainly classified as substance-induced anxiety disorders and anxiety disorders due to a general medical condition. See also substance-induced disorders.
organic brain syndrome organic mental syndrome.
organic delusional syndrome a term used in a former system of classification, denoting an organic mental syndrome characterized by delusions caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with clouding of consciousness (delirium), intellectual impairment (dementia), or prominent hallucinations (organic hallucinosis). The disorders are now mainly classified as substance-induced psychotic disorders and psychotic disorders due to a general medical condition. See also substance-induced disorders.
organic disease a disease due to or accompanied by structural changes in organs or tissues.
organic mental disorder a term formerly used to denote any mental disorder with a specifically known or presumed organic etiology; now discouraged because of the implication that other disorders do not have an organic basis. The term was sometimes used as a synonym of organic mental syndrome.
organic mental syndrome former term for a constellation of psychological or behavioral signs and symptoms associated with brain dysfunction of unknown or unspecified etiology, grouped according to symptoms (see also organic mental disorder). The designating of certain conditions as having an organic basis, possibly implying that other conditions do not, is currently discouraged.
organic mood syndrome a term used in a former system of classification, denoting an organic mental syndrome characterized by manic or depressive mood disturbance caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with clouding of consciousness (delirium), intellectual impairment (dementia), or prominent delusions or hallucinations (organic delusional syndrome or organic hallucinosis). Such disorders are now mainly classified as substance-induced mood disorders and mood disorders due to a general medical condition. See also substance-induced disorders.
organic personality syndrome former term for an organic mental syndrome characterized by a marked change in behavior or personality, e.g., emotional instability, marked apathy, or impaired impulse control, caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with delirium, prominent mood disturbance, delusions, or hallucinations. Such disorders are now mainly classified on the basis of etiology, such as those that are substance-induced or are due to a general medical condition.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

or·gan·ic

(ōr-gan'ik),
1. Relating to an organ.
2. Relating to or formed by an organism.
3. Organized; structural.
4.
[G. organikos]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

organic

(ôr-găn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or derived from living organisms: organic matter.
2. Of, relating to, or affecting a bodily organ: an organic disease.
3.
a. Of, marked by, or involving the use of fertilizers or pesticides that are strictly of animal or vegetable origin: organic vegetables; an organic farm.
b. Raised or conducted without the use of drugs, hormones, or synthetic chemicals: organic chicken; organic cattle farming.
c. Serving organic food: an organic restaurant.
d. Simple, healthful, and close to nature: an organic lifestyle.
4. Chemistry Of or designating carbon compounds.
n.
1. An organic food or a product made from organic materials.
2. A substance, especially a fertilizer or pesticide, of animal or vegetable origin.
3. Chemistry An organic compound.

or·gan′i·cal·ly adv.
or′gan·ic′i·ty (ôr′gə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

organic

Alternative nutrition 
adjective Referring to foods that are grown without pesticides or artificial growth enhancers, and are processed and preserved without chemicals.
 
Chemistry
adjective Relating to carbon-based chemicals.
 
Mainstream medicine
adjective Referring to a disease process that can be objectively evaluated as it is organ-based, that is, of the organs (in contrast to mental disorders, which are not organic).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

organic

adjective Alternative nutrition Relating to foods that are grown without pesticides or artificial growth enhancers, which are processed and preserved without chemicals Chemistry Relating to carbon-based chemicals Clinical medicine Relating to a disease process that can be objectively evaluated, as it is organ-based, in contrast to mental disorders, which are not organic
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

or·gan·ic

(ōr-gan'ik)
1. Relating to an organ.
2. Relating to or formed by an organism.
3. Organized; structural.
5. Denotes agricultural production of a more ecologically beneficial type.
[G. organikos ]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

organic

1. Pertaining to animals or plants, rather than to non-living matter.
2. Pertaining to an organ of the body.
3. Caused by a pathological change in bodily structure rather than by a purely mental process.
4. Of a chemical compound (other than carbon dioxide or its salts or carbon monoxide), containing carbon.
5. Of food, grown without the use of artificial fertilizers.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

organic 

Pertaining to a disorder in which there is a lesion within the body. See functional.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

Patient discussion about organic

Q. i'm going on an organic diet for fibromyalgia does anyone know if this will help this awful pain

A. Couldn't find any research proving that organic diet improves fibromyalgia. On the other hand, couldn't actually find a research that contradict it (or even dealing with it), so no one can give you any established answer for your answer, so it's your decision.

Anyway, remember to consult a professional (e.g. a doctor) before you start any diet or any other intervention.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/fibromyalgia.html

Q. Can a Chiropractor tell if your organs are shutting down?

A. She told me that because my spine is out of line so much, that it's causing my organs to shut down. I have been having bladder problems. I really think she is just trying to scare me.

Q. I'm looking for natural/organic ways to deal with carpal tunnel syndrome. My Boss has Carpal Tunnel syndrome. I'm looking for some natural remedies to help her ease the pain.

A. I have found that MSM (GNC brand) 1500mg per day works for me. I talked to an Orthopedic Surgeon asking him why it works... he said "they really don't know why it works, but it works for many of my patients". When I stop taking my MSM the symptoms return so it is not a cure.

I have tried other brands of MSM and found the GNC brand works the best for me. It takes about 2 weeks to begin to see the results and several more weeks to get the full affect.

More discussions about organic
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References in periodicals archive ?
The questionnaire included measures of the three ideology dimensions identified in the literature: progressive decision-making, social responsibility, and organicity.(2) Respondents were asked to rate statements on the degree to which each one reflects or agrees with the explicit and publicly expressed philosophy of the company along a scale of 1 (company strongly agrees) to 5 (company strongly disagrees).
Table 2 also shows that conglomerates place the greatest emphasis on organicity. The complexity of managing firms that have diversified into unrelated areas may require an emphasis on decentralization and flexibility.
Paradoxically, then, allegory comes to confront the traditional accusation brought against it by the Romantics and the exponents of the alleged organicity of the symbol, that is, its lack of motivation, although one must differentiate between demotivation resulting from exegesis gone awry and the supposedly unmotivated universalizing process at work in allegoresis and exposed by the exponents of the symbolic mode.(9)
The effective implementation of entrepreneurial export strategies often requires a high level of organicity within the export channel structure.
As for starting an entrepreneurial spiral, three such administrative mechanisms are the reward structure, communication mechanisms, and structural organicity.
While wanting to break with a traditional mode of representation, which they perceive as inadequate to express a modern, changed sensibility, the nostalgic turn towards concepts of organicity and freedom, in which art and life become joined under the auspices of the universal, suggests a double contrasting movement.
Amidst this wealth of research and reflection, perhaps the most helpful papers for understanding what is at stake in Tymieniecka's project are Arion Kelkel's paper "De la phenomenologie des vecus a l'hermeneutique de la vie" and Jean-Marc Mouillie's "Le fait de vivre dans la phenomenologie." Kelkel reviews the meaning of life (Leben, vie) in (1) Dilthey's Lebensphilosophie, which first disclosed the uniquely historical nature of human life, as distinct from the mere organicity of other living things; (2) Husserl's late notion of the Lebenswelt, which is the noematic correlate of the constituting transcendental ego; and (3) Heidegger's "hermeneutic of life" (p.
It is not intended to diagnose organicity or identify the source of impairment (e.g., psychiatric illness, use of psychotropic medication, brain injury).
While many structural attributes have been empirically linked to innovation activity in organizations (see, for example, Lawrence & Lorsch, 1967; Mintzberg, 1979), perhaps the single aspect of structure that best defines entrepreneurial organizations is structural organicity. Organicity is the extent to which the organization's overall form can be characterized as organic or mechanistic, to use Burns and Stalker' s (1961) labels.
For the Lukacs of the Theory of the Novel, unlike that of 'Aesthetic Culture', there is, however, no escape from culture if one is to achieve organicity and totality: 'A totality of men and events is possible only on the basis of culture, whatever one's attitude towards it' (p.
This translation of Existenz is crucial, but it has been difficult to make, given the general confusion of Heidegger's thought with both the German and French versions of Existentialism, and also because of the difficulty that remains in translating Leben (historical human life, as distinguished from organicity), which at the time Heidegger wrote Sein und Zeit still retained the sense given it in the Lebensphilosophie of Dilthey, who also influenced Heidegger's dunking in important ways.