orchiopexy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

orchiopexy

 [or´ke-o-pek″se]
surgical fixation of an undescended testis in the scrotum. An incision is made over the inguinal canal and the testis is brought down. In most cases the surgeon applies traction by placing a suture in the lower scrotum and attaching the suture to the inner thigh with adhesive tape. This traction is continued for about a week. Alternatively, a surgeon may prefer to suture the undescended testis to surrounding tissue in the scrotum.
Patient Care. Preoperative care of the child is routine. During the postoperative period care must be taken to avoid disturbing the tension mechanism. Contamination of the suture line should be avoided, and if the boy is not toilet trained, he usually must have an indwelling catheter in place until his incision has healed.

or·chi·o·pex·y

(ōr'kē-ō-pek'sē),
1. Surgical treatment of an undescended testicle by freeing it and implanting it into the scrotum.
2. Anchoring a testis susceptible to torsion in the scrotum.
[orchio- + G. pēxis, fixation]

orchiopexy

/or·chio·pexy/ (or´ke-o-pek″se) fixation in the scrotum of an undescended testis.

orchiopexy

[ôr′kē·ōpek′sē]
Etymology: Gk, orchis + pexis, fixation
an operation to mobilize an undescended testis, bring it into the scrotum, and attach it so that it will not retract.

orchiopexy

Urology The surgical fixation of an undescended testes in the scrotum. See Cryptorchidism.

or·chi·o·pex·y

(ōr'kē-ō-pek'sē)
Surgical treatment of an undescended testicle by freeing it and implanting it into the scrotum.
Synonym(s): cryptorchidopexy, orchidopexy.
[orchio- + G. pēxis, fixation]

Orchiopexy

Surgical procedure that places the testicles in the scrotum.

orchiopexy

surgical fixation of an undescended testis in the scrotum; an unethical practice in veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The epidemiology of congenital cryptorchidism, testicular ascent and orchiopexy.
4) The risk of death from testicular malignancy in men with an undescended testis is nearly 10 times the risk in normal men, and the risk is increased in both the undescended testis after orchiopexy and within the normally descended testis.
Diagnostic laparoscopy, especially for undescended testes and for orchiopexy is the most common indication.
Risk factors placing a patient in a "high-risk group" for testicular cancer include a history of any one or more of the following: cryptorchidism (undescended testicle), orchiopexy (surgical correction of the undescended testicle), testicular atrophy (degeneration of the testicle), prior diagnosis of mumps, orchitis (inflammation of the testicle), inguinal hernia, hydrocele (fluid around the testicle), and previous testicular cancer (American Academy of Family Physicians, 1994).
HR4 Clinical testicular exam: Men with a history of cryptorchidism, orchiopexy, or testicular atrophy.
Conventional laparoscopic procedures for urological diseases in children, such as nephrectomy, pyeloplasty and orchiopexy, have also proven to be safe and effective with outcomes comparable to open procedures.