fissure

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Related to orbital fissure: orbital fossa, orbital gyri, orbital foramen

fissure

 [fish´er]
1. a narrow slit or cleft, especially one of the deeper or more constant furrows separating the gyri of the brain.
2. a deep cleft in the surface of a tooth, usually due to imperfect fusion of the enamel of the adjoining dental lobes. It can be treated with a dental sealant to decrease risk of caries.
abdominal fissure a congenital cleft in the abdominal wall; see also gastroschisis and thoracoceloschisis. Called also celoschisis.
anal fissure (fissure in ano) a painful lineal ulcer at the margin of the anus.
anterior median fissure a longitudinal furrow along the midline of the ventral surface of the spinal cord and medulla oblongata.
fissure of Bichat transverse fissure (def. 2).
branchial fissure pharyngeal groove.
central fissure fissure of Rolando.
collateral fissure a longitudinal fissure on the inferior surface of the cerebral hemisphere between the fusiform gyrus and the hippocampal gyrus.
Henle's f's spaces filled with connective tissue between the muscular fibers of the heart.
hippocampal fissure one extending from the splenium of the corpus callosum almost to the tip of the temporal lobe; called also hippocampal sulcus.
longitudinal fissure the deep fissure between the two cerebral hemispheres.
palpebral fissure the longitudinal opening between the eyelids.
portal fissure porta hepatis.
posterior median fissure
1. a shallow vertical groove in the closed part of the medulla oblongata, continuous with the posterior median fissure of the spinal cord.
2. a shallow vertical groove dividing the spinal cord throughout its length in the midline posteriorly; called also posterior median sulcus.
presylvian fissure the anterior branch of the fissure of Sylvius.
pudendal fissure rima pudendi.
Rolando's fissure (fissure of Rolando) a groove running obliquely across the superolateral surface of a cerebral hemisphere, separating the frontal lobe from the parietal lobe. Called also central fissure and central sulcus.
fissure of round ligament one on the visceral surface of the liver, lodging the round ligament in the adult.
sylvian fissure (fissure of Sylvius) one extending laterally between the temporal and frontal lobes, and turning posteriorly between the temporal and parietal lobes.
transverse fissure
2. the transverse cerebral fissure between the diencephalon and the cerebral hemispheres; called also fissure of Bichat.
zygal fissure any of the fissures on the cerebral cortex that consist of two branches connected by a stem.

fis·sure

(fish'ŭr),
1. A deep furrow, cleft, or slit; a gap between bones or bony elements. (For most of the brain fissures, see entries under sulcus.)
2. In dentistry, a developmental break or fault in the tooth enamel.
Synonym(s): fissura (1) [TA]
[L. fissura]

fissure

(fĭsh′ər)
n.
1. A long narrow opening; a crack or cleft.
2. The process of splitting or separating; division.
3. A separation into subgroups or factions; a schism.
4. Anatomy A normal groove or furrow, as in the liver or brain, that divides an organ into lobes or parts.
5. Medicine A break in the skin, usually where it joins a mucous membrane, producing a cracklike sore or ulcer.
intr. & tr.v. fis·sured, fis·suring, fis·sures
To form a crack or cleft or cause a crack or cleft in.

fissure

Dermatology A groove, cleft, or sulcus, which may or may not be normal. See Anal fissure, Slanted palpebral fissure Neurology A groove or narrow cleft that separates 2 parts, such as the cerebral hemispheres of the brain.

fis·sure

(fish'ŭr)
1. A deep furrow, cleft, or slit.
See also: sulcus
Synonym(s): fissura (2) .
2. dentistry A developmental break or fault in the tooth enamel.
Synonym(s): fissura (1) .

fissure

A deep groove or furrow that divides an organ, such as the brain, into lobes.

Fissure

A deep crack.

fissure

A cleft or a groove found in an organ. In the brain, it usually applies to the deepest cleft. See sulcus.
calcarine fissure Fissure on the medial aspect of the occipital lobe separating the upper and lower halves. Its anterior portion is in front of the parieto-occipital fissure and the posterior portion extends round the occipital pole and even appears for a short distance on the lateral surface where it ends at the lunate sulcus. Syn. calcarine sulcus. See visual area; line of Gennari.
embryonic fissure See optic fissure.
inferior orbital fissure An elongated opening lying between the lateral wall and the floor of the orbit. It is bounded anteriorly by the maxilla and the orbital process of the palate bone and posteriorly by the greater wing of the sphenoid bone. Syn. sphenomaxillary fissure. See infraorbital artery; zygomatic nerve; Table O4.
interpalpebral fissure See palpebral aperture.
optic fissure An invagination of the inferior portion of the optic stalk of the embryo. The hyaloid vessels pass through that fissure to supply the developing crystalline lens. In cases in which the invagination (or fissure) fails to fully close, colobomas will be formed. Syn. embryonic fissure; choroidal fissure. See hyaloid artery; optic cup.
palpebral fissure See palpebral aperture.
sphenoidal fissure See superior orbital fissure.
sphenomaxillary fissure See inferior orbital fissure.
superior orbital fissure An elongated opening lying between the roof and the lateral walls of the orbit, that is, between the two wings of the sphenoid bone. Syn. sphenoidal fissure. See abducens nerve; oculomotor nerve; ophthalmic nerve; trochlear nerve; superior ophthalmic vein; Table O4.

fis·sure

(fish'ŭr)
In dentistry, developmental break or fault in tooth enamel.

Patient discussion about fissure

Q. What are the dentists going to do if I have Pit and fissure caries? I look at my teeth and i see tiny black stuff on the fissures of my molars. I am so freakin scared. Are the dentists going to do something painful?

A. Well you will have to see a dentist if you want an answer on what kind of treatment they will offer you. Today dentists use good anesthesia so anything they will do is not supposed to be painful.

More discussions about fissure
References in periodicals archive ?
This foramen is located between the inferior end of the superior orbital fissure and the foramen rotundum.
Superior orbital fissure syndrome after facial trauma.
JS consists of signs of involvement of all the neural structures traversing the optic foramen and the superior orbital fissure. Thus, signs of optic neuropathy coexist with other cranial nerve symptoms.9,10 Visual loss secondary to 2nd nerve involvement was the main point in differential diagnosis of JS.
Specifically, light may pass through the lens and vitreous humour of the eye to the retina, then penetrate the retroorbital tissue to the superior orbital fissure, gaining access to the intracranial cavity.
Wysocki, "Clinical anatomy of the superior orbital fissure and the orbital apex," Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, vol.
The cavernous sinus is a complex venous network, which includes parts of the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins, located immediately behind the superior orbital fissure. It extends posteriorly along the base of the skull, bounded medially by the region of the sphenoid bone housing the pituitary gland as far as the apex of the petrous temporal bone.
Superior orbital fissure syndrome with bell's palsy: report of case.
Sphenoidal tubercle is a surgical reference point for the search of maxillary nerve in the surgical access to the infratemporal fossa (Rusu & Leonardi, 2010), considering its close relationship with the groove of the maxillary nerve located in the maxillary tuberosity when it's heading towards the orbit through the inferior orbital fissure such as infraorbitary nerve and the relation established through the origin of the deep portion of the temporal muscle with the foramen rotundum (Testut & Latarjet; Geers et al.).
Likewise, 11 and 17 patients underwent superior orbital fissure decompression (SOFD) and non-SOFD treatment for CNs III, IV, and VI injury, respectively.
CT may demonstrate asymmetric enlargement of the cavernous sinus due to an enhancing soft tissue infiltrate, which may extent through superior orbital fissure into the orbital apex.
A cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and a mass around the left orbital apex invading the superior orbital fissure and the optic canal with intradural growth could be seen (Fig.