oral tolerance therapy

oral tolerance therapy

a treatment in which a patient ingests a foreign protein in an attempt to develop tolerance to that protein when it is encountered as an antigen. In addition to inhibiting allergic reactions, the therapy may suppress immune responses in general.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pilot studies of humans, while not establishing that oral tolerance therapy will be effective, have enabled some patients to stop taking conventional immunosuppressive drugs entirely.
In contrast, researchers theorize, oral tolerance therapy would cause T2 cells to release immunosuppressive cytokines only in areas that contain the target protein; in MS, for example, the target would be a specific brain protein.
Multiple sclerosis isn't alone in responding to oral tolerance therapy.
Two years later, both patients remain on oral tolerance therapy.
Not all autoimmune diseases will respond to oral tolerance therapy, says Daniel Drachman of Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore.