thermometer

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Related to oral thermometer: clinical thermometer, electronic thermometer

thermometer

 [ther-mom´ĕ-ter]
an instrument for determining temperatures, in principle making use of a substance (such as alcohol or mercury) with a physical property that varies with temperature and is susceptible of measurement on some defined scale.
Temperatures on Celsius and Fahrenheit thermometers related to temperature ranges. From Elkin et al., 2000.
axilla thermometer a clinical thermometer that is placed in the axilla.
Celsius thermometer one that uses the Celsius scale.
centigrade thermometer one having the interval between two established reference points divided into 100 equal units, such as the Celsius thermometer.
clinical thermometer one used to determine the temperature of the human body.
electronic thermometer a clinical thermometer that uses a sensor based on thermistors, solid-state electronic devices whose electrical characteristics change with temperature. The reading is recorded within seconds, some having a red light or other device to indicate when maximum temperature is reached. Available models include hand-held, desk-top, and wall-mounted units, all having probes that are inserted orally or rectally.
Fahrenheit thermometer one that uses the Fahrenheit scale.
Kelvin thermometer one that uses the Kelvin scale.
oral thermometer a clinical thermometer whose mercury containing bulb is placed under the tongue.
recording thermometer a temperature-sensitive instrument by which the temperature to which it is exposed is continuously recorded.
rectal thermometer a clinical thermometer that is inserted in the rectum.
resistance thermometer one that uses the electric resistance of metals (thermocouple) to determine temperature.
self-registering thermometer
2. one that registers the maximum or minimum temperature attained in the measurement.
tympanic thermometer an electronic clinical thermometer that gives a digital reading in less than two seconds. Second-generation tympanic thermometers work by monitoring the temperature when the ear opening is sealed.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ther·mom·e·ter

(ther-mom'ĕ-tĕr),
An instrument for indicating the temperature of any substance; often a sealed vacuum tube containing mercury, which expands with heat and contracts with cold, its level accordingly rising or falling in the tube, with the exact degree of variation of level being indicated by a scale, or, more recently, a device with an electronic sensor that displays the temperature without the use of mercury.
See also: scale.
[thermo- + G. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thermometer

(thər-mŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
An instrument for measuring temperature, especially one having a graduated glass tube with a bulb containing a liquid, typically mercury or colored alcohol, that expands and rises in the tube as the temperature increases.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ther·mom·e·ter

(thĕr-mom'ĕ-tĕr)
An instrument for indicating the temperature of any substance; formerly a sealed vacuum tube containing mercury, which expands with heat and contracts with cold, its level accordingly rising or falling in the tube, with the exact degree of variation of level being indicated by a scale, but increasingly a digital apparatus.
See also: scale
[thermo- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

thermometer

A device for registering body temperature. Thermometers may be analogue, as in the case of the common mercury expansion thermometer or colour-change devices, or may have a digital display.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ther·mom·e·ter

(thĕr-mom'ĕ-tĕr)
An instrument for indicating temperature of any substance; often sealed vacuum tube containing mercury, which expands with heat and contracts with cold, its level accordingly rising or falling in the tube, with exact degree of variation of level being indicated by a scale, or, today, a device with an electronic sensor that displays temperature without use of mercury.
[thermo- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Results of this study found 36% of readings from TA thermometers differed by [+ or -]0.5[degrees]C or more, indicating despite the common use of electronic oral thermometers, more studies are warranted with various noninvasive devices.
The current study appears to be the first clinical study to evaluate use of the digital disposable oral thermometer in acutely ill patients.
Comparison of tympanic thermometer to rectal and oral thermometers in a pediatric emergency department.
Effect of tachypnea on the estimation of body temperature by an oral thermometer. New England Journal of Medicine, 308(16), 945-946.
For example, Niven and colleagues (2015) stated that tympanic, temporal, axillary, and oral thermometers should not be used "when accurate measurement of a patient's temperature will influence diagnosis and management" (p.
Rectal thermometers are thicker than oral thermometers.
Lawson and colleagues (2007), Myny, DeWaele, Defloor, Blot, and Colardyn (2005), and Schmitz and colleagues (1995) recommended electronic oral thermometers when rectal methods are contraindicated.
underarm devices, and 15% chose digital oral thermometers.
Of 503 mothers surveyed, 22% preferred infrared aural units, 21% favored digital underarm devices, and 15% chose digital oral thermometers.