oral decongestant

oral decongestant

a drug such as pseudoephedrine prescribed for the relief of nasal congestion. Oral decongestants do not appear to cause nasal swelling after long periods of use. They are commonly combined with antihistamines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Abuse may cause constipation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use an oral decongestant for a limited time or a nasal spray decongestant for no more than five days.
If you are still congested, try using a saline nasal rinse or an oral decongestant (talk to your doctor if you have high blood pressure).
The effectiveness of nasal decongestants, oral decongestants and oral decongestant-antihistamines in the treatment of acute otitis media in children.
If your nose is still stuffed up or you're still coughing, add an oral decongestant like pseudoephedrine (Sudafed) or a cough suppressant like dextromethorphan (Vicks 44 Cough Relief).
And most oral decongestant products contain pseudoephedrine, which should not be used by diabetics.
If bacteria cause your sinusitis, antibiotics used along with a nasal or oral decongestant will usually help.
In addition to antibiotics, your doctor also might prescribe a topical or an oral decongestant or a corticosteriod nasal spray.
If your stuffy nose or cough doesn't seem to be getting better, add an oral decongestant like pseudoephedrine (Sudafed) and a cough suppressant like dextromethorphan, or DM (Robitussin Cough DM).
Most patients with sinusitis that is caused by bacteria can be treated successfully with antibiotics used along with a nasal or oral decongestant.
Pseudoephedrine, the only oral decongestant approved by the Food and Drug Administration, is associated with various central nervous system effects, including nervousness and insomnia.
Secretory otitis media, oral decongestant and antihistamine.