oral contraceptive


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Related to oral contraceptive: oral contraceptive pill

contraceptive

 [kon″trah-sep´tiv]
1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that does this; see also contraception.
oral contraceptive a compound, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. See also contraception.

or·al con·tra·cep·tive (OC),

any orally effective preparation designed to prevent conception.

oral contraceptive

n.
Any of various pills containing estrogen and a progestin, or a progestin alone, that inhibit ovulation and are used to prevent conception. Also called birth control pill.

oral contraceptive (OC)

oral hormone medication for contraception. The two major sex hormones in females are estrogens and progestins. When synthetic forms of these hormones are taken, they inhibit the production of gonadotropin-releasing hormone by the hypothalamus; the pituitary therefore does not secrete gonadotropins to stimulate follicular maturation and ovulation. Depending on the formulation, cyclical changes in the uterus, vagina, and breasts may be similar to a normal menstrual cycle. Progestin-only oral contraceptives generally do not block ovulation. Instead they cause the cervical mucus to remain thick, which prevents the entry of sperm into the uterus and fallopian tubes. Seasonale, an extended-cycle method of contraception with menstrual periods every three months, was recently approved by the FDA. Contraindications to the oral contraceptives include pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, liver disease, hyperlipidemia, thrombotic complications, coronary artery disease, and sickle cell disease. Patients with depression and migraine headaches and those who are heavy cigarette smokers need to be followed up more often. The pregnancy rate when oral contraceptives are used correctly is less than 0.2% a year. See also contraception.

oral contraceptive

Gynecology A preparation of synthetic hormones intended to make a ♀ inconceivable by inhibiting ovulation OC formats Sequential method, combined method. See Biphasic contraceptive, Contraceptives, Monophase contraceptive, Third-generation contraceptive, Triphasic contraceptive.
Oral contraceptives, contraindications
Age–over 35
Breast CA or other estrogen-dependent malignancy
Breast-feeding and < 6 weeks after delivery
Cardiovascular defects–acute MI, ASHD, CVA/TIA
Circulatory defects–varicose veins, phlebitis
Cystic fibrosis
Diabetes and long-term OC use
Hypertension
Liver disease–hepatitis, CA, neoplasms
Migraines
Obesity–BMI > 30
Pregnancy–current, suspected, or recently ended
Sickle-cell disease
Smoking–especially > 1 pack/day

or·al con·tra·cep·tive

(OC) (ōr'ăl kon'tră-sep'tiv)
A medication taken by mouth designed to prevent conception.

oral contraceptive

A drug or combination of drugs taken by mouth for the purpose of preventing pregnancy. Most oral contraceptives must be taken by women. They contain oestrogens and/or PROGESTOGENS and act by preventing the ovaries from producing eggs (ova). They also have some effect in making the lining of the womb less suitable for implantation of the ovum and may make the mucus in the canal of the cervix less easily passable by sperms. Oral contraceptives are second after sterilization in effectiveness in avoiding pregnancy. Risk attributable to oral contraceptives is very small among non-smokers but there are certain categories, notably women with thrombophilia from genetic mutations, in which the risk is slightly increased. The increased risk of breast cancer has been greatly exaggerated. It amounts to no more than roughly 1 additional case per 20,000 women. Also known as ‘the pill’. See also CONTRACEPTION.

oral

1. pertaining to the mouth; taken through or applied in the mouth, as an oral medication.
2. denoting that aspect of the teeth which faces the oral cavity or tongue.

oral cavity
see mouth.
oral contraceptive
contraceptive agent taken by mouth.
oral dysphagia
see oropharyngeal dysphagia.
oral necrobacillosis
an infectious stomatitis of calves caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. There are deep necrotic ulcers in the mouth, e.g. lateral to the molar teeth, foul breath, drooling saliva, fever and toxemia. See also calf diphtheria. Called also necrotic stomatitis.
oral neoplasm
is usually squamous cell carcinoma of the gum epithelium. It impedes mastication.
oral plasmacytoma
an unusual benign oral neoplasm of older dogs; appears as a red, lobulated, raised mass on the gingiva.
oral plate
separates the stomodeum from the pharyngeal cavity; subsequently breaks down to become the palatoglossal arch; called also oropharyngeal membrane.
oral restraint
the use of a mouth speculum, gag or wedge to permit examination and the carrying out of procedures in the mouth without danger of being bitten.
References in periodicals archive ?
These observations obviously need to be considered in the proper context of a careful understanding of possible risks and benefits associated with the use of oral contraceptives, as well as those associated with other forms of contraception," Biller said.
Our study showed significant correlation of blood pressure with age like a previous study which showed that Mean blood pressures adjusted for age were significantly higher among oral contraceptive users (125/70 mmHg) than they were among non-users (123/68 mmHg P less than 0.
There was a trend toward higher live birth rates in the lifestyle intervention group (26%) and the oral contraceptives group (12%, P = .
Equally important is understanding the role of synthetic hormones in oral contraceptives.
They propose that women's ability to accurately self-assess their contraindications to combination oral contraceptives may also apply to progestin-only contraceptives, such as injectables, which have fewer contraindications and potentially could be administered by trained staff in drug shops.
Current oral contraceptives consist of low doses of estrogens (0.
Ethinyl estradiol is the most frequently used estrogen in combined oral contraceptive pills in a dose range from 20-35 (Mu)g.
The effect of tetracycline on levels of oral contraceptives.
Glenmark remains the only Indian company to be granted an abbreviated new drug applications (ANDA) approval for a female hormonal product and an oral contraceptive product.
A Danish study, published in the British Medical Journal, suggests that the risk of thromboembolism in users of the oral contraceptive pill decreases with increasing duration of use and with decreasing oestrogen doses.
The dedicated space for oral contraceptive production fulfills a regulatory requirement needed to sell these products in many countries.
Risk of cancer and the oral contraceptive pill: long term follow-up of women in the UK shows no increased risk.