oral cavity cancer


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

oral cavity cancer

Squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth or tongue. Oral cavity cancers are only rarely caused by salivary gland tumors or sarcomas.
See also: cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
Margin Status.--Accurate margin assessment is critical when evaluating a complex surgical resection of oral cavity cancers. (2, 13, 14, 38-41) All surgical margins should be assessed, including the deep soft tissue and bone margins.
(2013) where toxic habits accounted for 93.5% among patients of oral cavity cancer.
Tobacco habits and risk of lung, oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer: a population-based case-control study in Bhopal, India.
The most common oral cavity cancer sites include the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, lip vermillion and buccal and retromolar mucosa, and the hard palate.
* Oral cavity cancer, which can affect the superficial lining of the mouth as well as the bony components of the upper and lower jaw.
Annually, it is estimated that 127,459 deaths are caused from oral cavity cancer worldwide, of which 96,720 occur in developing countries (16)
In additional unadjusted regression analyses, GNI was a significant predictor of oral cavity cancer incidence rates for male (p=0.0004) and female (p=0.0017) populations; similarly, GNI was a significant predictor of pharynx cancer incidence rates for both male (p<0.0001) and female populations (p=0.0051).
-- Among patients with low socioeconomic status, blacks are 2.5 times more likely to die from oral cavity cancer and at least three times more likely to present with advanced disease, according to a study of more than 2.000 patients in the Atlanta area.
(p=0.002, OR: 2.568, 95% CI: 1.411-4.675).15 Regarding association of family history with age at diagnosis of cancer some studies have found higher association in young patients,16,17 while few have reported an association with older age group.18 In contrast to our observation Brown et al found a stronger association between the risk of oral cavity cancer and family history of head and neck cancer in subjects aged above 45.15 We observed an improved overall survival in younger patients.