optical tweezers


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optical tweezers

pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
A technique that uses a single-beam laser directed through an objective lens to trap, image, and manipulate micron-sized particles in three dimensions.

optical tweezers

A laser device used to alter or manipulate microorganisms, molecules, or living cells.
See also: optical
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References in periodicals archive ?
The base line of one end of each of the pt-division machineries is fixed to the cover glass (yellow lines), while the other end is trapped by the optical tweezers (arrowheads) and an infrared laser (red lines).
The optical trapping force induced by the magnetic dipole resonance enables the applications of optical tweezers at the nanometer scale, opening a new realm for optical trapping and manipulation of nanoparticles such as biomolecules and quantum dots.
Roichman and her team of researchers are currently pioneering the use of optical tweezers to create the next generation of photonic devices.
This developing system is called an Optical Tweezers (OT) and it uses a focused laser beam and a camera to move and track microscopic objects.
The use of optical tweezers in order to measure the force in objects at nanometirc scale can be an interesting idea for the researchers in all fields, including biosciences.
This maximizes the capability of the optical tweezers.
The principle of optical tweezers (optical trapping) is the use of radiation pressure from light incident on an object.
With optical tweezers, a laser method that enables them to manipulate individual DNA strands, the researchers tugged and twisted one strand at a time, deforming it in various ways.
Using single-molecule FRET and optical tweezers, I will monitor the effect of Scc2-Scc4 on conformational changes of cohesin as it is loaded on a DNA template.
Therefore, optical tweezers cannot grasp super-small objects like individual proteins, which are only a couple of nanometers in diameter.

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