optic glioma

optic glioma

Neuropathology An astrocytoma arising in the optic nerve, which is associated with neurofibromatosis, type 1 Clinical Invasion and destruction of optic nerve tissue, loss of vision
References in periodicals archive ?
At 9 months old, he was diagnosed with an optic glioma and underwent chemotherapy for 16 months.
PAs can arise in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), wherein they most commonly manifest as "optic glioma," a nonspecific term that implies the involvement of the optic nerve proper (10).
Among the neuroepithelial tumors, one case of optic meningioma grade 1 constituting 2% of benign optic tumors in males and one case of low grade optic glioma was found to be closer to the other study in Pakistan.15
(1) Six or more pigmentations greater than 5 mm before puberty and greater than 15 mm after puberty (cafe au lait) (2) One plexiform neurofibroma or more than two neurofibromas of any type (3) Axillary or inguinal freckling (4) Optic glioma (5) Two or more "Lisch" nodules (iris hamartoma) (6) Bone lesions (7) Presence of at least one of these clinical findings in first-degree relatives
NG2-cells are not the cell of origin for murine neurofibromatosis-1 (Nf1) optic glioma. Oncogene.
Optic glioma and precocious puberty in a girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 carrying an R681X mutation of NF1: case report and review of the literature, BMC Endocr Disord.
Tumors on the optic nerve, also known as an optic glioma
Increased c-Jun-NH2-kinase signaling in neurofibromatosis1 heterozygous ([Nf1.sup.+/-]) microglia was shown to promote optic glioma proliferation [72] and glioma growth [73].
Understanding how different kinds of optic glioma bear the traces of their separate origins is the key to being able to tailor treatment to a specific individual, according to Gutmann.
Diagnosis of the autosomal dominant syndrome--which results from a neurofibromin defect and occurs in 1 of 2,000-4,500 individuals--requires the presence of two or more of the following diagnostic criteria: six or more CALMs greater than 0.5 cm in diameter in prepubertal children, or greater than 1.5 cm in those postpubertal; two or more neurofibromas of any type, or one plexiform neurofibroma; axillary and/or inguinal freckling (Crowe's sign); optic glioma; two or more Lisch nodules; a bony lesion (such as sphenoid dysplasia or long bone dysplasia); and a first-degree relative with NF1.