mood

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mood

 [mo̳d]
a pervasive and sustained emotion that, when extreme, can color one's whole view of life; in psychiatry and psychology the term is generally used to refer to either elation or depression. See also mood disorders.
mood-congruent consistent with one's mood, a term used particularly in the classification of mood disorders. In disorders with psychotic features, mood-congruent psychotic features are grandiose delusions or related hallucinations occurring in a manic episode or depressive delusions or related hallucinations in a major depressive episode, while mood-incongruent psychotic features are delusions or hallucinations that either contradict or are inconsistent with the prevailing emotions, such as delusions of persecution or of thought insertion in either a manic or a depressive episode.
mood disorders mental disorders whose essential feature is a disturbance of mood manifested by episodes of manic, hypomanic, or depressive symptoms, or some combination of these. The two major categories are bipolar disorders and depressive disorders.
mood-incongruent not mood-congruent.

mood

(mūd),
The pervasive feeling, tone, and internal emotional state of a person that, when impaired, can markedly influence virtually all aspects of the person's behavior or his or her perception of external events.

mood

(mldbomacd) the emotional state or state of mind of an individual.

mood

(mo͞od)
n.
A state of mind or emotion.

mood

a prolonged subjective emotional state that influences one's whole personality and perception of the world. Examples include sadness, elation, and anger. See also affect.

mood

A pervasive and sustained emotion which can markedly colour one’s perception of the world. Mood refers to a person’s pervasive and sustained emotional temperament; affect refers to the fluctuating changes in a person’s more immediate physio-emotional response(s).  

Examples, moods
Depression, elation, anger, anxiety.

Examples, affect
Dysphoric, elevated, euthymic, expansive, irritable.

mood

Psychiatry A pervasive and sustained emotion that, in the extreme, markedly colors one's perception of the world Examples Depression, elation, anger. See Affect, Bad mood, Emotion, Good mood.

mood

(mūd)
The pervasive feeling, tone, and internal emotional state that, when impaired, can markedly influence virtually all aspects of a person's behavior or perception of external events.

mood

a temporary but relatively enduring positive or negative affective state. Typically differentiated from emotion in that a mood is of longer duration and not necessarily evoked in response to a specific event. moodstate a person's current mood. See also affect, emotion.

Patient discussion about mood

Q. Major mood disorder! Hi guys! My topic is all about major mood disorder, bipolar 1 mixed with psychotic features and I would like to ask if I could get some information regarding with its introduction on international, national and local. Hope you all understood what I mean to ask.

A. Methinks all these brain disorders have everything to do with a lack of copper. With all our modern technology and artificial fertilizers and processing of foods, the food has become so depleted of minerals that our bodies and brains have become so depleted that we cannot even function properly. Start taking kelp, calcium magnesium, cod liver oil, flax seed oil, and raw apple cider vinegar. This will bring healing and normal function to the brain and body systems. The emotions will calm down and be more manageable. If you are taking a vitamin with more manganese than copper it will add to the dysfunction. Don't waste your money. There you are! Some solutions rather than more rhetoric about the problem.

Q. Mood- disorder? What will happen to the people who refuse treatment? I know someone whose mother got diagnosed with "mood- disorder" and now this person says that she don't have it. But all her brothers and sisters have this, and are on medication. Is there a way to save our family heritage?

A. well done, i will start to collect with the agreement of Iri possible causes for disorders (bipolar, mood, whatever you want to call it) to help people to recognize themselves. they all can start in the moment we are in the embryo. parental conflicts, aggressions, sexual behaviours, drugs, alcohol, smoking in abondance can affect us from this moment on.

Q. I think that bipolar is just a mood disorder. I think that bipolar is just a mood disorder. Do I?

A. You are correct, according to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) Bipolar Disorder is a Mood Disorder. Other conditions in this category are Anxiety Disorders--and of course--Unipolar Depression.

More discussions about mood
References in periodicals archive ?
48) Whitman's optative mode very much operates in this projective register; by attempting to will something radically into being, be it the wholeness of his nation or the hope of a peaceful and reconciled futurity, Whitman invokes the "shapes of the future centuries" (106) and the "centuries, centuries yet ahead" (107) into the "thousands of years to come
11) The Optative (illustrated in (9)) which refers to a virtual plane is the other construction which does not require the auxiliary.
Keywords: subjunctive mood, optative mood, Athenian morphology, Athenian language, optative morphosemantics, Albanian language mood
More specifically, the use of a mood marker in the clauses denoting purpose, reason or intended temporal endpoint in (18), (20) and (22) signals the presence of some evaluating authority whose mental state is represented in that clause: the use of optative in the Slave purpose clause in (18) signals that this clause represents the perspective of someone who regards eating as desirable, the use of apprehensive in the Bininj Gun-Wok reason clause in (20) signals that this clause represents the mental state of someone who regards an attack from the snake as undesirable, and the use of purposive in the Arrernte intended endpoint clause in (22) signals the perspective of someone who finds the return of the mother desirable.
The formula employs conditional or optative forms (I wished for the pencil of Hogarth / if I had the powers of Reynolds), yet it suggests in the end that the job has been done: in other words, it conveys to the reader a sense that the text has managed to appropriate the painterly force that, on the surface, has been deplored as absent.
His handling of the three-word vocabulary of an optative apple-note lets us infer, as I have done, that he has been trained in a skilled procedure.
Anal intercourse, then, is adverted to, though just this once, and then in the optative mood, when Mercutio jokingly and lasciviously envisions it between Romeo and the chaste Rosaline, and hers is the fantasied "open arse.
But authority shifts back to the man when he refuses to stop talking, and Jig's final questions ask permission, as optative imperatives, to end the conversation.
13) However, beyond the fact that a lustrous nationalistic vision of this sort would be expected in such an address to a royal patron, the figuration of the poet's task as a literal exhumation of decayed, dusty relics ("poudreuses reliques" line 7) from the tomb, along with the expression of his hope for the king via a laborious optative subjunctive (line 9), casts serious doubt on the possibility of such a rebirth.
The duende often enters American art when what Emerson calls "the optative mood" turns into a struggle to save one's soul.
In many senses, 'encore', like 'fraiche', is infused with the voice of the poet, because while it may help constitute a statement of fact, it has a considerable optative charge.
Hawthorne was suspicious of the optative mood gripping the nation and undercut it in his short stories and novels.