opium

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opium

 [o´pe-um]
the air-dried milky exudation from unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum and P.album (the opium poppies). It contains some 25 alkaloids, the most important being codeine, morphine (from which heroin is derived), noscapine, papaverine, and thebaine, all of which can be used for their narcotic and analgesic effects. Opium is poisonous in large doses; because it is highly addictive, production and cultivation of the poppies is prohibited by most nations by international agreement, and its sale or possession for other than medical uses is strictly prohibited by federal, state, and local laws. See also drug abuse.

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm),
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum (family Papaveraceae) or the variant, P. album. Contains some 20 alkaloids, including morphine, noscapine, codeine, papaverine, and thebaine, about 10% all in varying amounts. Used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and for diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
Synonym(s): gum opium, meconium (2)
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

opium

/opi·um/ (o´pe-um) [L.] air-dried milky exudation from incised unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum or its variety album, containing some 20 alkaloids, the more important being morphine, codeine, and thebaine; the alkaloids are used for their narcotic and analgesic effect. Because it is highly addictive, opium production is restricted and cultivation of the plants from which it is obtained is prohibited by most nations under an international agreement.

opium

(ō′pē-əm)
n.
1. A bitter, yellowish-brown, strongly addictive narcotic drug prepared from the dried latex of unripe pods of the opium poppy and containing alkaloids such as morphine, codeine, and papaverine.
2. Something that numbs or stupefies.

opium

[ō′pē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, opion, poppy juice
a milky exudate from the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum and Papaver album yielding 9.5% or more of anhydrous morphine. It is an opioid analgesic, a hypnotic, and an astringent. Opium contains several alkaloids, including codeine, morphine, and papaverine. See also codeine, morphine sulfate, opium tincture, papaverine hydrochloride, paregoric.

opium

Substance abuse A narcotic from Papaver somniferum Pharmacologic effects Inhibits peristalsis–may induce constipation; used to ↓ GI cramps, diarrhea Overdose In excess, respiratory depression. See Heroin, Narcotic.

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm)
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum. Contains some 20 alkaloids, including morphine, noscapine, codeine, papaverine, and thebaine. Used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and for diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm)
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum or the variant, P. album; used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and to treat diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

opium (ō´pēəm),

n the actual juice of the poppy,
Papaver somniferum. It contains morphine, codeine, nicotine, narceine, and many other alkaloids.

opium

the air-dried milky exudation from unripe capsules of the opium poppy Papaver somniferum or its variety P. somniferum album. Opium contains some 25 alkaloids, the most important being morphine (from which heroin is derived), narcotine, codeine, papaverine, thebaine and narceine; the alkaloids are used for their narcotic and analgesic effect. It is poisonous in large doses. Because it is highly addictive, opium production and cultivation of opium poppies is prohibited by most nations by international agreement, and its sale or possession for other than medical or veterinary uses is strictly prohibited by law.

camphorated tincture of opium
opium poppy
see papaversomniferum.
References in classic literature ?
In a very short time a decrepit figure had emerged from the opium den, and I was walking down the street with Sherlock Holmes.
Convinced that something was amiss with him, she rushed down the steps--for the house was none other than the opium den in which you found me to-night--and running through the front room she attempted to ascend the stairs which led to the first floor.
Now for the sinister cripple who lives upon the second floor of the opium den, and who was certainly the last human being whose eyes rested upon Neville St.
So the sensation dies off for the time; and the unmoved policeman (to whom a little opium, more or less, is nothing), with his shining hat, stiff stock, inflexible great-coat, stout belt and bracelet, and all things fitting, pursues his lounging way with a heavy tread, beating the palms of his white gloves one against the other and stopping now and then at a street-corner to look casually about for anything between a lost child and a murder.
Here's a man unknown, proved to have been in the habit of taking opium in large quantities for a year and a half, found dead of too much opium.
The opium and other goods we had on board would make it appear the ship had been at Bengal.