opium


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opium

 [o´pe-um]
the air-dried milky exudation from unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum and P.album (the opium poppies). It contains some 25 alkaloids, the most important being codeine, morphine (from which heroin is derived), noscapine, papaverine, and thebaine, all of which can be used for their narcotic and analgesic effects. Opium is poisonous in large doses; because it is highly addictive, production and cultivation of the poppies is prohibited by most nations by international agreement, and its sale or possession for other than medical uses is strictly prohibited by federal, state, and local laws. See also drug abuse.

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm),
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum (family Papaveraceae) or the variant, P. album. Contains some 20 alkaloids, including morphine, noscapine, codeine, papaverine, and thebaine, about 10% all in varying amounts. Used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and for diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
Synonym(s): gum opium, meconium (2)
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

opium

/opi·um/ (o´pe-um) [L.] air-dried milky exudation from incised unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum or its variety album, containing some 20 alkaloids, the more important being morphine, codeine, and thebaine; the alkaloids are used for their narcotic and analgesic effect. Because it is highly addictive, opium production is restricted and cultivation of the plants from which it is obtained is prohibited by most nations under an international agreement.

opium

(ō′pē-əm)
n.
1. A bitter, yellowish-brown, strongly addictive narcotic drug prepared from the dried latex of unripe pods of the opium poppy and containing alkaloids such as morphine, codeine, and papaverine.
2. Something that numbs or stupefies.

opium

[ō′pē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, opion, poppy juice
a milky exudate from the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum and Papaver album yielding 9.5% or more of anhydrous morphine. It is an opioid analgesic, a hypnotic, and an astringent. Opium contains several alkaloids, including codeine, morphine, and papaverine. See also codeine, morphine sulfate, opium tincture, papaverine hydrochloride, paregoric.

opium

Substance abuse A narcotic from Papaver somniferum Pharmacologic effects Inhibits peristalsis–may induce constipation; used to ↓ GI cramps, diarrhea Overdose In excess, respiratory depression. See Heroin, Narcotic.

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm)
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum. Contains some 20 alkaloids, including morphine, noscapine, codeine, papaverine, and thebaine. Used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and for diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm)
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum or the variant, P. album; used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and to treat diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

opium (ō´pēəm),

n the actual juice of the poppy,
Papaver somniferum. It contains morphine, codeine, nicotine, narceine, and many other alkaloids.

opium

the air-dried milky exudation from unripe capsules of the opium poppy Papaver somniferum or its variety P. somniferum album. Opium contains some 25 alkaloids, the most important being morphine (from which heroin is derived), narcotine, codeine, papaverine, thebaine and narceine; the alkaloids are used for their narcotic and analgesic effect. It is poisonous in large doses. Because it is highly addictive, opium production and cultivation of opium poppies is prohibited by most nations by international agreement, and its sale or possession for other than medical or veterinary uses is strictly prohibited by law.

camphorated tincture of opium
opium poppy
see papaversomniferum.
References in periodicals archive ?
And morphine, of course, first isolated from opium in 1803 by the German pharmacist Friedrich Serturner, is a mainstay of pain therapy.
The opium seized and investigation report were referred to the Anti-Narcotic Department of the Dubai Police for further legal action.
Priced at $950 million, or 4 percent of national GDP in 2013, the farm-gate value of opium production increased by almost a third.
The country last year destroyed 23,771 hectares of opium fields, he added.
The Afghanistan Opium Winter Risk Assessment 2013 issued by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime was conducted in two phases.
The high level of opium prices reported in 2011 was one of the principal factors that led to the increase in opium poppy cultivation in 2012," the UNODC report reads.
About 20 million people worldwide use opium or its derivatives.
The findings remind us not only that opium is harmful, but raise questions about the risks of long term prescription opioids for treatment of chronic pain.
With opium and methamphetamine production on the rise since 2006, Burma is not on track to meet its goal to be narcotics-free by 2014 and, as is the case with most Burmese government entities, the CCDAC suffered from a crippling lack of funding, equipment, and training to support its law-enforcement mission.
The largest areas of opium poppy cultivation are in the violent south of the country, where it can be hard to make money on legal crops and where criminal networks exist to buy and sell the poppy crop.
Still, the benefits of swapping to saffron from opium are long term and farmers need to be convinced.
HEART: Abdul Khaliq Stanikzai says the tiny mound of red and yellow threads in the palm of his hand could help cure Afghanistan of its opium addiction.