opium


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Related to opium: laudanum

opium

 [o´pe-um]
the air-dried milky exudation from unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum and P.album (the opium poppies). It contains some 25 alkaloids, the most important being codeine, morphine (from which heroin is derived), noscapine, papaverine, and thebaine, all of which can be used for their narcotic and analgesic effects. Opium is poisonous in large doses; because it is highly addictive, production and cultivation of the poppies is prohibited by most nations by international agreement, and its sale or possession for other than medical uses is strictly prohibited by federal, state, and local laws. See also drug abuse.

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm),
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum (family Papaveraceae) or the variant, P. album. Contains some 20 alkaloids, including morphine, noscapine, codeine, papaverine, and thebaine, about 10% all in varying amounts. Used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and for diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
Synonym(s): gum opium, meconium (2)
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

opium

(ō′pē-əm)
n.
1. A bitter, yellowish-brown, strongly addictive narcotic drug prepared from the dried latex of unripe pods of the opium poppy and containing alkaloids such as morphine, codeine, and papaverine.
2. Something that numbs or stupefies.

opium

Substance abuse A narcotic from Papaver somniferum Pharmacologic effects Inhibits peristalsis–may induce constipation; used to ↓ GI cramps, diarrhea Overdose In excess, respiratory depression. See Heroin, Narcotic.

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm)
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum. Contains some 20 alkaloids, including morphine, noscapine, codeine, papaverine, and thebaine. Used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and for diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]

o·pi·um

(ō'pē-ŭm)
The air-dried milky exudation obtained by incising the unripe capsules of Papaver somniferum or the variant, P. album; used as an analgesic, hypnotic, and diaphoretic, and to treat diarrhea and spasmodic conditions.
[L. fr. G. opion, poppy-juice]
References in periodicals archive ?
He was so keen to destroy the opium trade that he presented to Parliament another report entitled The Need for the Suppression of the Opium Traffic in Canada only a week after his compensation report.
Heroin, morphine, and other opiates trace their origins to a single plant, the opium poppy.
In the meantime, reports and studies from Helmand province, where many of the air strikes have taken place, show that the reason for poppy and opium cultivation is related strongly to the lack of a central government and security.
Several major seizures of raw opium and heroin this year in Vietnam couriered by Hmong villagers has renewed scrutiny on the relationship between opium and Laos' most marginalised people.
Yet, thinking that better security is the way to prevent opium production is a catch 22, which in turn justifies the massive investment in military operations instead of using that money to improve the lives of ordinary Afghans, desperate enough to grow poppies to feed their families.
Says the UNODC in its annual report on opium cultivation and production in Afghanistan, "Despite eradication rising 111% to cover 1,853 acres, the number of poppy-free provinces declined to 10 from 13 in 2016.
Clinicians should be aware that persons using opium products that appear to have been smuggled through Iran could be at risk for lead poisoning.
The failure of 15 years of efforts to curb the production of opium in the country is also clear.
The most promising section of the book concentrates on the geography and cultivation of the opium poppy.
According to Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Robert Charles, "[C]utting down the opium supply is central to establishing a secure and stable democracy, as well as winning the global war on terrorism" (2004).