opiophobia

opiophobia

A doctor’s unwillingness or fear of prescribing (opioid) medication to patients.

opiophobia

Psychology A fear that physicians have of prescribing needed pain medications. See Phobia.

opiophobia

(ō″pē-ō-fō′bē-ŭ) [L. fm. Gr. opion, opium + ″]
Unwarranted or unreasonable concerns about the use or prescription of narcotic analgesics.
References in classic literature ?
Once settled at the plantation he seemed to like to sit upon the wide portico in the shade of one of the big Corinthian pillars, smoking his cigar lazily and listening attentively to Gaston's experience as a sugar planter.
It was more probable, therefore, that the descendants of a Pyncheon who had emigrated to Virginia, in some past generation, and became a great planter there,--hearing of Hepzibah's destitution, and impelled by the splendid generosity of character with which their Virginian mixture must have enriched the New England blood,--would send her a remittance of a thousand dollars, with a hint of repeating the favor annually.
Clare was the son of a wealthy planter of Louisiana.
Tom forged a bill of sale and sold him mother to an Arkansas cotton planter for a trifle over six hundred dollars.
In the course of his Narrative, he relates two in- stances of murderous cruelty,--in one of which a planter deliberately shot a slave belonging to a neigh- boring plantation, who had unintentionally gotten within his lordly domain in quest of fish; and in the other, an overseer blew out the brains of a slave who had fled to a stream of water to escape a bloody scourging.
Mason, a West India planter and merchant, was his old acquaintance.
Thus talking hand in hand alone they pass'd On to thir blissful Bower; it was a place Chos'n by the sovran Planter, when he fram'd All things to mans delightful use; the roofe Of thickest covert was inwoven shade Laurel and Mirtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side ACANTHUS, and each odorous bushie shrub Fenc'd up the verdant wall; each beauteous flour, IRIS all hues, Roses, and Gessamin Rear'd high thir flourisht heads between, and wrought Mosaic; underfoot the Violet, Crocus, and Hyacinth with rich inlay Broiderd the ground, more colour'd then with stone Of costliest Emblem: other Creature here Beast, Bird, Insect, or Worm durst enter none; Such was thir awe of man.
These were Captain Langford, the English officer before mentioned; a Virginian planter, who had come to Massachusetts on some political errand; a young Episcopal clergyman, the grandson of a British earl; and, lastly, the private secretary of Governor Shute, whose obsequiousness had won a sort of tolerance from Lady Eleanore.
From certain hints that had escaped him, Monsieur Le Quoi was suspected of having been a West- India planter, great numbers of whom had fled from St.
On these occasions there was a degree of magnificence of the purse about them, and a peculiar propensity to expenditure at the goldsmith's and jeweler's for rings, chains, brooches, necklaces, jeweled watches, and other rich trinkets, partly for their own wear, partly for presents to their female acquaintances; a gorgeous prodigality, such as was often to be noticed in former times in Southern planters and West India creoles, when flush with the profits of their plantations.
The planter, therefore, hired elephants by ones and twos and threes, and fell to work.
He was a civilian, if one might judge from his habit, which was that of a planter.