opiate withdrawal syndrome

opiate withdrawal syndrome

Physiological responses to abrupt cessation of the use of addictive substances. The symptoms include chills, runny nose, yawning, irritability, insomnia, and cramping. Physical signs of withdrawal include elevated blood pressure, diaphoresis, diarrhea, and muscle spasms. Discomfort peaks at 48 to 72 hr; however, symptoms persist for 7 to 10 days. Treatment includes methadone and psychological support and counseling.
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The neonatal opiate withdrawal syndrome consists of hypertonia, tremor, agitation and myoclonus.
Withdrawal symptoms (such as muscle tension, muscle cramps, and insomnia) were evaluated with the Short Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome scale, and pain was evaluated with the Huskisson's analogue scale for pain.
As a partial opiate agonist, buprenorphine reverses acute and subacute opiate withdrawal syndromes in most patients in a matter of hours.