opiate receptors

o·pi·ate re·cep·tors

regions of the brain that have the capacity to bind morphine; some, along the aqueduct of Sylvius and in the center median, are in areas related to pain, but others, as in the striatum, are not related.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

o·pi·ate re·cep·tors

(ō'pē-ăt rĕ-sep'tŏrz)
Regions of the brain that have the capacity to bind morphine; some, along the aqueduct of Sylvius and in the centromedian nucleus, are in areas related to pain, but others, as in the striatum, are not related.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

o·pi·ate re·cep·tors

(ō'pē-ăt rĕ-sep'tŏrz)
Brain regions with capacity to bind morphine.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The NAMED program is the only one in the world that concentrates on not stimulating the opiate receptors or even suppressing them naturally through specially designed menus.
The opiate receptors are usually not purged free of narcotic.
Because of its pain-relieving mechanism and because it works via the opiate receptors, kratom has been considered a potential alternative to traditional opiates, with perhaps even the ability to help wean people off opiates.
[25] Another study using animal models reported that there occurred diminished analgesic response to morphine resulting from desensitization of brain opiate receptors caused by the induction of luteinizing hormone surge during ovulation.
"Regarding mechanism, it is believed that the somatic (as opposed to the drug craving) symptoms of opiate withdrawal in the adult arise from areas of the brainstem called the locus coeruleus and periaqueductal gray, which express opiate receptors. These areas are undergoing major developmental changes in utero and at the time of birth.
Opiate receptors are present on placental villi and contribute to the genesis of placental cells and their function.
The action of these medications includes binding to opiate receptors and changing the perception of and response to painful stimuli while producing central nervous system depression that is generalized (Florence & Palmer, 2003).
Suboxone contains a partial opiate agonist, which attaches to the opiate receptors in the brain, minimizing cravings without causing a high.
He explained that naloxone travels to the brain, where it works to push opiates off of opiate receptors.
USA[degrees]based Tramadol Abuse Help, a centre for subA[degrees] stance abuse and mental health treatment facilities across the country, describes in detail the damage caused: Tramadol activates the opiate receptors in the brain which produces endorA[degrees] phins giving rise to sensations of pleasure and pain relief.
Localization of opiate receptors in substantia nigra: evidence by lesion studies.