opiate


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opiate

 [o´pe-at]
1. any sedative narcotic containing opium or any of its derivatives; the most common ones are codeine, heroin, methadone, and morphine.
2. hypnotic (def. 2).
endogenous o's endorphins and enkephalins that are released by the body as a defense against pain or during physical exercise, deep relaxation, sexual activity, crying, and laughing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·ate

(ō'pē-āt),
Any preparation or derivative of opium.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

opiate

(ō′pē-ĭt, -āt′)
n.
1. Any of various analgesic, narcotic drugs derived from the opium poppy, such as morphine or codeine.
2. See opioid.
3. Something that dulls the senses and induces relaxation or torpor.
adj.
1.
a. Containing opium or any of its derivatives.
b. Resembling opium or its derivatives in activity.
2. Inducing sleep or sedation; soporific.
3. Causing dullness or apathy; deadening.
tr.v. (-āt′) opi·ated, opi·ating, opi·ates
1. To subject to the action of an opiate.
2. To dull or deaden as if with a narcotic drug.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

opiate

Any natural–eg, opium semi-synthetic–eg, morphine or synthetic–eg, fentanyl, usually alkaloid narcotic agent with opium-like activity. See Drug screening, Narcotic.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

o·pi·ate

(ō'pē-ăt)
Any preparation or derivative of opium.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

opiate

a narcotic substance derived from opium.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Opiate

Any narcotic analgesic derived from a natural source, such as morphine from the opium poppy.
Mentioned in: Methadone
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·ate

(ō'pē-ăt)
Any preparation or derivative of opium.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
But if they want to prescribe medicines to help patients overcome opiate addiction, they face an array of government restrictions and systemic obstacles.
Opiates are used by 1 A percent of total population, with 140.000 using heroin and 84.000 using opium.
Almost half of pain patients surveyed (46%) expressed some form of concern about taking prescription opiates: 39% of chronic pain patients and 30% of acute pain patients are concerned with becoming addicted to their pain medications, and 38% of chronic pain patients and 43% of acute pain patients feel uncomfortable taking their prescribed opiates.
Glaxo's decision to part with the opiates business comes as Tasmania's poppy industry is facing a tough crop and the United Nations is expected to cut the state's poppy crop area this week.
Early said the death toll from opiate overdoses would be even higher, but for the overdose-reversing drug Narcan, which is now being administered by police and other first responders.
Figures released follow ing a parliamentary ques tion have revealed 20 inmates at the high secu rity HMP Frankland, in County Durham, tested positive for use of opiates, while one batch of heroin was discovered in the jail from January 1 to Decem ber 31 last year.
"None of the objective measures of AS [ankylosing spondylitis] disease activity or progression were found to be associated with opiate usage.
- suggested that Vivitrol helped opiate addicts stay drug-free more often and for longer periods of time.
Use of an opiate immunoassay as a screening tool for past use of opiates is reasonable in ruling out recent use of heroin, morphine, and codeine.
Understanding pain medications Pain medications usually fall into two categories: non-opiates and opiates (often called narcotics).
Phentinol and Pethidine are opiates which can, if misused, cause cardio-respiratory problems.
The Islamic Republic of Iran is a major transit route for opiates smuggled from Afghanistan and Pakistan to the Persian Gulf, Turkey, Russia, and Europe.