ophthalmia neonatorum


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Related to ophthalmia neonatorum: inclusion conjunctivitis

ophthalmia

 [of-thal´me-ah]
severe inflammation of the eye or of the conjunctiva or deeper structures of the eye.
Egyptian ophthalmia trachoma.
gonorrheal ophthalmia gonorrheal conjunctivitis.
ophthalmia neonato´rum any hyperacute purulent conjunctivitis, such as gonorrheal conjunctivitis, occurring during the first 10 days of life, usually contracted during birth from infected vaginal discharge of the mother. The term formerly referred only to gonorrheal conjunctivitis, but now other types are recognized. It is prevented by instilling silver nitrate or other medication in the eyes of the newborn, although in an occasional infant silver nitrate may cause iatrogenic ophthalmia. Called also neonatal conjunctivitis.
phlyctenular ophthalmia phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis.
sympathetic ophthalmia granulomatous inflammation of the uveal tract of the uninjured eye following a wound involving the uveal tract of the other eye, resulting in bilateral granulomatous inflammation of the entire uveal tract. Called also sympathetic uveitis.

oph·thal·mi·a ne·o·na·to·rum

a conjunctival inflammation occurring within the first 10 days of life; causative agents include Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Chlamydia trachomatis.

ophthalmia neonatorum

[nē′ōnətôr′əm]
a purulent conjunctivitis and keratitis of the newborn resulting from exposure of the eyes to chemical, chlamydial, bacterial, or viral agents. Chemical conjunctivitis usually occurs as a result of the instillation of silver nitrate in the eyes of a newborn to prevent a gonococcal infection. Also called neonatal conjunctivitis. See also conjunctivitis.
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Ophthalmia neonatorum

ophthalmia neonatorum

Acute neonatal conjunctivitis, neonatal conjunctivitis Ophthalmology Inflammation of the neonatal conjunctiva, often infection by N gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis; ON causes blindness in up to 4000 newborns/yr in Africa Treatment Silver nitrate, erythromycin, other antibiotics; povidone-iodine may be more effective, less costly, toxic, and may reduce ocular HIV and herpes simplex

oph·thal·mi·a ne·o·na·to·rum

(of-thal'mē-ă nē-ō'nā-tō'rŭm)
A conjunctival inflammation occurring within the first 10 days of life; causes include Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Chlamydia trachomatis.
Synonym(s): infantile purulent conjunctivitis.

ophthalmia neonatorum

Eye inflammation occurring in the newborn baby as a result of infection acquired during birth. The condition may be due to GONORRHOEA and this, unless treated, may lead to blindness. Routine prophylactic antibiotic eye drops are often used to prevent such an outcome.

ophthalmia

severe inflammation of the eye or of the conjunctiva or deeper structures of the eye.

albinistic ophthalmia
occurs in the pseudo-albinistic fry of the Atlantic salmon; results from the bilateral exophthalmia which is inherited in the species.
contagious ophthalmia
a disease of sheep and goats caused by rickettsia (Colesiota) conjunctivae. Characterized by lacrimation, blepharospasm, keratitis and corneal opacity.
ophthalmia neonatorum
a purulent conjunctivitis occurring during the first 10 days of life, before the eyelids separate in puppies and kittens. In kittens usually caused by feline herpesvirus (rhinotracheitis).
periodic ophthalmia
a disease of horses with a causal relationship to infection wtih Leptospira spp. and possibly Onchocerca cervicalis. Manifested by recurrent attacks of photophobia, lacrimation, conjunctivitis, keratitis, hypopyon and iridocyclitis. Usually terminates in blindness.
sympathetic ophthalmia
inflammation of the uveal tract of the originally unaffected eye following a wound or disease involving the uveal tract or lens of the other eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most serious consequence of gonorrhea and chlamydia in pregnant women is the occurrence of ophthalmia neonatorum, a severe eye infection that can cause blindness in newborns.
When Erythromycin Ophthalmic Ointment was in short supply in 2009, the CDC recommended the use of another brand of gentamicin ophthalmic ointment that contains preservatives, as an alternative treatment for the prophylaxis of ophthalmia neonatorum.
For example, two of the leading causes of blindness and visual impairment in the United States in the early 1900s were ophthalmia neonatorum and trachoma.
He was admitted to the hospital for presumed ophthalmia neonatorum.
Evidence suggests that the application of topical ocular medications reduces blindness caused by gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum and also "protects infants from ocular infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis1.
In addition, because the most common class of infection in the first month of life is primarily caused by STD pathogens present in the birth canal (126), the same mucosal antibodies could be used in a predelivery cervicovaginal lavage or applied to newborns' eyes for studies in the prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum.