ophiasis

ophiasis

 [o-fi´ah-sis]
a form of alopecia areata involving the temporal and occipital margins of the scalp in a continuous band.

o·phi·a·sis

(ō-fī'ă-sis),
A form of alopecia areata in which the loss of hair occurs in bands along the scalp margin partially or completely encircling the head.
[G., fr. ophis, snake]

o·phi·a·sis

(ō-fī'ă-sis)
A form of alopecia areata in which the loss of hair occurs in bands along the scalp margin partially or completely encircling the head.
[G., fr. ophis, snake]
References in periodicals archive ?
Four Patients Had a History of One Episode Each in The Past and None Had Any Family History (n=24) Clinical Findings Number % of Total Site Eye Brow 1 Multiple Scalp 22 parameters Beard 3 included Other 1 Universalis 1 4 Pattern Totalis 1 4 Focal (patch) 19 79 Ophiasis 3 13 No.
The ophiasis, totalis, and universalis forms are rarer and have worse prognoses (1).
* Alopecia areata may mimic the ophiasis (band-like) pattern of hair loss seen with FFA, but it is a non-scarring disorder that typically lacks any signs of inflammation.
One form of alopecia is the ophiasis pattern in which there is a long band passing above the ear, occurring in 5% of child hood cases.
Another form of alopecia is the ophiasis pattern in which there is a long band passing above the ear, occurring in 5% of childhood cases.
Alopecia areata is a chronic, nonscarring alopecia with variety of patterns of patchy hair loss, diffuse alopecia, alopecia totalis and universalis, ophiasis. Many other conditions like tinea capitis, trichotillomania, secondary syphilis, androgenetic alopecia or telogen effluvium can present with nonscarring alopecia.1-3 Trichoscopy is a noninvasive method for image analysis of hair and scalp.
Type of AA: In the present study most common type of AA is patchy type 73%, followed by ophiasis in 7%, sisaphio in 7%, totalise in 4%, universalise in 3%, reticulate in 3%, diffuse in 3% of cases which were comparable to Thomas et al.
Based on the pattern, patchy AA was most commonly seen, followed by ophiasis and sisiapho.
Majority (89%) of the patients had patchy type of AA, 6% had reticulate pattern and 4% had ophiasis pattern.
Scalp is the most common affected site.4 Alopecia areata can be classified according to its pattern, as follows: patchy, reticular, ophiasis, sisaipho, alopecia totalis and alopecia universalis.
Alopecia areata peaks between the second and fourth decades with equal sex incidence.Clinical patterns of alopecia areata include patchy, confluent, diffuse, ophiasis, alopecia totalis and alopecia universalis.1,2,3It may occur as a single, self-limiting episode or may recur at varying intervals over many years.34-50% of patients will recover within one year and 14-25% will progress to alopecia totalis or universalis.2 The predisposition to alopecia areata is genetically determined.1 Between 10% and 20% of patients give a family history of the disease.