OPERA

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OPERA

Cardiology A clinical trial–Omapatrilat/Vanlev in Persons with Enhanced Risk of Atherosclerotic Events–that compared omapatrilat with placebo in managing Pts with stage I isolated systolic HTN. See Isolated systolic hypertension, Omapatrilat, Vasopeptidase inhibitor Gynecology Outpatient endometrial resection/ablation A minimally invasive procedure for treating abnormal uterine bleeding as alternative to hysterectomy. See Hysterectomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along with a ballpoint and opera glasses, they have become standard equipment for dance-going.
Another presidential memento, the opera glasses Abe Lincoln was holding when he was shot at the theatre in 1865, made pounds 296,500 at the same Christie's sale in New York.
There were also many optical instruments produced in the 19th Century, including telescopes, opera glasses, spy glasses and microscopes, which are particularly desirable at auction today.
Meanwhile, 10 million visitors - 10 times as many as dust down their opera glasses - go through museum doors every year.
From the fluffy ostrich fan and mother-of-pearl opera glasses to the cool, ivory mah-jongg tiles and miniature enameled King Tut charms from Egypt, each item became a secret-filled genie's lamp waiting to be rubbed.
One elderly gentleman, a shade ostentatiously, used opera glasses.
From the general-interest standpoint, Binoculars, Opera Glasses, and Field Glasses by Fred Watson of the Anglo-Australian Observatory is considerably more restricted than Seyfried's book.
The painting was reported stolen by its owner on September 29 along with a metal safe which contained seven gold watches, three pairs of gold opera glasses and 20 cufflinks, estimated to worth around e1/4162,000 in total.
OPERA GLASSES: Reginald Marah as the Theatre Manager, under the watchful eye of the Phantom, played by Peter Straker, in the Empire's auditorium in April 1991
Unfortunately, I lost my opera glasses. They were Victorian, mounted in silver and hallmarked Birmingham and had been passed down through the family generations.