opacity

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opacity

 [o-pas´ĭ-te]
1. the condition of being opaque.
2. an opaque area.

o·pac·i·ty

(ō-pas'i-tē),
1. A lack of transparency; an opaque or nontransparent area.
2. On a radiograph, a more transparent area is interpreted as an opacity to x-rays in the body.
3. Mental dullness.
[L. opacitas, shadiness]

opacity

/opac·i·ty/ (o-pas´it-e)
1. the condition of being opaque.
2. an opaque area.

opacity

[ōpas′itē]
Etymology: L, opacitus, shadiness
pertaining to an opaque quality of a substance or object, such as cataract opacity.

opacity

Medtalk A clouded or opaque area. See Corneal opacity.

o·pac·i·ty

(ō-pas'i-tē)
1. A lack of transparency; an opaque or nontransparent area.
2. On a radiograph, a more transparent area is interpreted as an opacity to x-rays in the body.
3. Mental dullness.
[L. opacitas, shadiness]

opacity 

The condition of a tissue or structure which is not transparent, or being opaque. The location of an opacity within the eye can be determined with a slit-lamp. It can also be determined using an ophthalmoscope and asking the patient to look up or down. If the opacity moves very little, or not at all, it is situated in the lens. If the opacity moves in the same direction as the eye it is situated in front of the lens and if it moves in the opposite direction it is situated in the vitreous humour. See cataract; muscae volitantes; corneal ulcer.

o·pac·i·ty

(ō-pas'i-tē)
1. On a radiograph, a more transparent area is interpreted as an opacity to x-rays in the body.
2. A lack of transparency.
[L. opacitas, shadiness]

opacity

1. the condition of being opaque, e.g. corneal opacity, lenticular opacity.
2. an opaque area.
3. radiopacity is the capacity of a substance to absorb radiation, rather than permit its passage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demarcated opacities made out the largest part of the teeth with the lesions (2.
Similar to other studies, the most common lesions in Lithuania were mild demarcated opacities.
All opacities of 1 mm and larger were included, as recommended by the FDI Working Group on DDE [1992].
Even though the size of the opacities was not measured in this study, we noticed that very small demarcated opacities involved only one or two teeth, were usually located on incisors and had white-yellowish colour.
Therefore, we divided demarcated hypomineralization lesions into two groups: opacities and disintegration lesions, in order to determine the severity level.
These areas present as yellow-brown opacities and may involve more teeth [Jalevik and Noren, 2000].
This supports the idea that molars affected by MIH, even if only opacities are present, need continuous follow-up for several years to detect the broken down enamel, as it is not known which part of the enamel will disintegrate and which part will remain intact [Weerheijm et al.
Only after regrouping of our data into opacities and disintegration defects we could differentiate mild lesions from moderate to severe ones.
Similar to the other studies, the most common lesions in Lithuania were mild demarcated opacities.