OP

(redirected from op-)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

OP

Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

OP

Abbreviation for:
occiput posterior
occipitoparietal
occlusal plane
oesophagopharyngeal
off pump
olfactory pit
oncotic pressure
opening pressure
operative procedure
opium, see there
opponens pollicis
opposite
organising pneumonia
organophosphate
oropharyngeal
osmotic pressure
osteopontin
osteopaenia
osteoporosis
oxidative phosphorylation
outpatient, see there
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

OP

Drug slang A street term for opium. See Opium Managed care Outpatient, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

OP

Abbreviation for occipitoposterior position.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

OP

see OSMOTIC PRESSURE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Policy Analyst James Plummer's op-ed, "Label Wars" appeared in Consumers' Research magazine.
The directions taken by The Washington Post's op-ed page are old and tedious.
Among the nation's major dailies, the Post has the most locked-in op-ed page.
After they all have their say--regardless of whether or not it is compelling--the Post's op-ed page becomes a bulletin board for establishment heavies whose columns read like memos shared among the good old boys.
The former warlord, now the president of Kissinger Associates, is given as much as 40 to 50 percent of the op-ed page to instruct those of lesser intelligence--i.e., the public--on how to keep America mighty.
Oddly, while the op-ed page languishes, much of the rest of the paper is a showcase for journalism ranging from first-class to world-class.
The current overseer of the Post op-ed page is Fred Hiatt.
To free up the Post's op-ed page would mean, first, telling all the regular columnists that their days of privileged regularity are over.
"The Post's op-ed page is a huge disappointment to those of us who cherish the craft of opinion writing," says Laird Anderson, emeritus professor of journalism at American University who taught opinion writing for more than twenty years after reporting for The Wall Street Journal.