oospore

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o·o·spore

(ō'ō-spōr),
A thick-walled fungus spore that develops from a female gamete either through fertilization or parthenogenesis in an oogonium.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

oospore

(ō′ə-spôr′)
n.
A thick-walled zygote developed from a fertilized oosphere, especially in an oomycete.

o′o·spor′ic (-spôr′ĭk, -spŏr′-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

oospore

(ō′ō-spor) [″ + sporos, seed]
A spore formed by the union of opposite sexual elements.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

oospore

the thick-walled spore found, for example, in some fungi, and arising from the fertilization of the OOSPHERE derived from an OOGONIUM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Oospore variation in three species of Chara (Charales, Chlorophyta).
Celakovsky (1874) had recognized three generations in the life cycle of Coleochaete: zoospore-producing thalli (A); gamete-producing thalli (B); and the multicellular body produced from the fertilized oospore (C).
For the inoculum, pearl millet leaves containing abundant oospores were collected from diseased 7042(S) and HB 3 plants growing in the downy mildew field nursery at ICRISAT-Patancheru 2 yr prior to the screen.
Individuals belonging to homothallic species can complete the sexual stage and produce oospores without mating.
The pathogen is mainly perpetuated through tuber and soil through production of oospores. The management of the disease can be done through host resistance, cultural adjustments, biological and use of fungicides.
It can be suggested that Hyaloperonospora parasitica persists as oospores in the soil over several years.
We use the term resting propagules to refer to spores such as chlamydospores and oospores that have thick cell walls resistant to desiccation, microbial degradation and temperature extremes, as might be found in compost piles.
capsici may survive in seed and host plant debris in the soil by means of oospores (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh045).