oogonium


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

oogonium

 [o″o-go´ne-um]
[Gr.], a primordial oocyte during fetal development; near the time of birth it becomes a primary oocyte.

o·o·go·ni·um

, pl.

o·o·go·ni·a

(ō'ō-gō'nē-ŭm, -ă),
1. Primordial germ cells; proliferate by mitotic division. All oogonia develop into primary oocytes before birth occurs; no oogonia are present after birth.
2. In fungi, the female gametangium bearing one or more oospores.
[G. ōon, egg, + gonē, generation]

oogonium

/oo·go·ni·um/ (-go´ne-um) pl. oogo´nia   [Gr.]
1. a primordial oocyte during fetal development; it is derived from a primordial germ cell and before birth becomes a primary oocyte.
2. the female reproductive structure in certain fungi and algae.

oogonium

(ō′ə-gō′nē-əm)
n. pl. oogo·nia (-nē-ə) or oogo·niums
1. Any of the cells that give rise through mitosis to the oocytes and are found in the ovaries of vertebrates.
2. A female reproductive structure in certain thallophytes and in oomycetes, usually a rounded cell or sac containing one or more oospheres.

o′o·go′ni·al (-nē-əl) adj.

oogonium

[ō′əgō′nē·əm] pl. oogonia
Etymology: Gk, oon + gonos, offspring
the precursor cell from which an oocyte develops in the fetus during intrauterine life. Also called ovogonium. See also oogenesis.

o·o·go·ni·um

, pl. oogonia (ō'ŏ-gō'nē-ŭm, -nē-ă)
1. Primordial germ cells; proliferate by mitotic division.
2. In fungi, the female gametangium bearing one or more oospores.
[G. ōon, egg, + gonē, generation]

oogonium

  1. an early DIPLOID (1) stage in GAMETOGENESIS of female animals giving rise to the OOCYTES.
  2. (in algae and fungi) the female sex organ containing the OOSPHERES.

oogonium

pl. oogonia [Gr.] an ovarian egg during fetal development; near the time of birth it becomes a primary oocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was also beneficial for regulation environment simulation for oocyte gene expression in vivo and study regulation of c-FLIP(L) on differentiation and proliferation of oogonium at the gene level.
Mature oogonia are cleaved into eight eggs that remain tightly packed inside the oogonium.
A single-celled oogonium (not a multicellular archegonium, as found in embryophytes) surrounds the single egg cell; however, the nonmotile female gamete, and oogamous reproduction, are similar to embryophytes.
Analysis on the basis of cell size and morphology revealed five stages of female germ cell: the oogonium and four stages of oocyte.