onychomadesis


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onychomadesis

 [on″ĭ-ko-mah-de´sis]
periodic separation of the proximal portions of the nail plate from the matrix and bed with subsequent shedding of the nails.

on·y·cho·ma·de·sis

(on'i-kō-mă-dē'sis),
Complete shedding of the nails, usually associated with systemic disease.
[onycho- + G. madēsis, a growing bald, fr. madaō, to be moist, (of hair) fall off]

on·y·cho·ma·de·sis

(on'i-kō-mă-dē'sis)
Complete shedding of the nails, usually associated with systemic disease.
[onycho- + G. madēsis, a growing bald, fr. madaō, to be moist, (of hair) fall off]
References in periodicals archive ?
Slime users can develop hand dermatitis, which can look eczematous with erythema, scaling, vesicles, and--in more chronic cases--lichenification and even can present with nail dystrophy such as onychomadesis. The dermatitis can be both an irritant contact dermatitis or contact allergy to a specific component of the slime.
An outbreak of coxsackievirus A6 hand, foot, and mouth disease associated with onychomadesis in Taiwan, 2010.
In conclusion, we report a case of Pveg that presented with paronychia-like lesions and onychomadesis with positive DIF study but negative anti-Dsg1 and anti-Dsg3 antibodies in blood.
Keywords: Adverse effect, epilepsy, onychomadesis, valproic acid
[3] In reference to our case strains of coxsackie virus A6 causes onychomadesis. This has been rarely reported.
Clinical macroscopic manifestations can range from mild pink discoloration or erythema to lichenoid papules, edema, and onychomadesis. The main histological feature of acute rejection is a mononuclear cell infiltrate.
Other nail changes include koilonychias, onycholysis, onychomadesis, punctuate leukonychia, trachyonychia, Beau's lines and red lunulae (8-11).
And if frank onychomadesis is observed, think about the time of year, and ask about recent fevers and rashes, because coxsackievirus may be the culprit.
The least common observed changes were onychomadesis and longitudinal melanonychia.
(13), and we were not able to assess the occurrence of onychomadesis or desquamation of the extremities, which have been frequently associated with CV-A6 outbreaks (9-11,15,20,32).
(31) Other nail features in AA are trachyonychia, Beaus lines, onychorhexis, thinning or thickening, onychomadesis, koilonychia, punctuate or transverse leukonychia and red spotted lunula.
Wester et al (6) observed the development of onychomadesis in a critically ill patient with a large pulmonary abscess.