onychomadesis


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onychomadesis

 [on″ĭ-ko-mah-de´sis]
periodic separation of the proximal portions of the nail plate from the matrix and bed with subsequent shedding of the nails.

on·y·cho·ma·de·sis

(on'i-kō-mă-dē'sis),
Complete shedding of the nails, usually associated with systemic disease.
[onycho- + G. madēsis, a growing bald, fr. madaō, to be moist, (of hair) fall off]

onychomadesis

/on·y·cho·ma·de·sis/ (on″ĭ-ko-mah-de´sis) complete loss of the nails.

on·y·cho·ma·de·sis

(on'i-kō-mă-dē'sis)
Complete shedding of the nails, usually associated with systemic disease.
[onycho- + G. madēsis, a growing bald, fr. madaō, to be moist, (of hair) fall off]

onychomadesis

; onychoptosis; aplastic anonychia separation of the nail plate from the proximal nail bed ± transient arrest of nail growth and Beau's line formation; occurs secondary to local trauma (e.g. subungual haematoma), dermatopathologies characterized by matrix scarring, local inflammation or infection, peripheral vascular disease, severe Raynaud's, or as a familial trait

onychomadesis

complete loss of the nails (claws).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Adverse effect, epilepsy, onychomadesis, valproic acid
3] In reference to our case strains of coxsackie virus A6 causes onychomadesis.
In our study common nail changes observed with psoriasis were pitting (60%), onycholysis (58%), subungual hyperkeratosis (48%) and longitudinal melanonychia (6%) and lastly onychomadesis.
An outbreak of coxsackievirus A6 hand, foot, and mouth disease associated with onychomadesis in Taiwan, 2010.
The international reports noted a severe rash, onychomadesis and desquamation, rare neurologic complications, and a high prevalence of infection in school-age children or adults, probably because of low herd immunity.
Wester et al (6) observed the development of onychomadesis in a critically ill patient with a large pulmonary abscess.
Seven (7%) of the 99 children with HFMD were brought for medical assistance for onychomadesis during the 9-67 days after the HFMD episode.
AS0, AEB0, AEL0, AB0: no hair loss from the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, body; AS1, AEB1, AEL1, AB1: incomplete hair loss from the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, body; AS2, AEB2, AEL2, AB2: complete hair loss from the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, body; NP: nail pitting; NO: nail onycholysis; NT: nail trachyonychia; NM: nail onychomadesis.
The association between more typical HFMD and onychomadesis has additionally been described in the United States and Europe but without a link to specific serotype or with a small percentage of CVA6-associated cases (9).
Some patients with HFMD had onychomadesis (periodic shedding of the nails) 1-2 months after onset of HFMD.
HFMD, followed by onychomadesis (nail shedding), was first reported in 2000 in 5 children in Chicago, Illinois, USA (10).
Onychomadesis was 1 characteristic feature in patients during this HFMD outbreak; parents and clinicians reported that their children shed fingernails and/or toenails within 1-2 months after HFMD (Figure 1).