onychectomy


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onychectomy

 [on″ĭ-kek´to-me]
excision of a nail or nail bed.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

on·y·chec·to·my

(on'i-kek'tŏ-mē),
1. Ablation of a toenail or fingernail.
2. veterinary medicine Surgical removal in felines of distal phalanges of all digits of forefeet, less commonly of hind feet. Procedure involves disarticulation of the P2/P3 junction and subsequent removal of entire P3 bone, at the terminus of which the claw is seated.
Synonym(s): declawing
[onycho- + G. ektomē, excision]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

onychectomy

(ŏn′ĭ-kĕk′tə-mē)
n.
Surgical removal of a toenail or fingernail.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

on·y·chec·to·my

(on'i-kek'tŏ-mē)
Ablation of a toenail or fingernail.
[onycho- + G. ektomē, excision]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Research has shown that onychectomy causes neither psychological problems nor an increase in undesirable behavior among cats that undergo the procedure.
As expected, the laser onychectomy procedures were relatively bloodless and required no tourniquets or bandages on the cats' paws.
But there are several steps far less extreme than onychectomy that owners can take to discourage this behavior or at least minimize its unpleasant results.
James Richards and colleagues at the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) issued a position paper that summed up their opinions on the controversial topic of feline declawing (onychectomy).
* Temporary synthetic nail caps are available as an alternative to onychectomy to prevent human injury or damage to property.
* The AAFP recognizes that feline onychectomy is an ethically controversial procedure; however, there is no scientific evidence that declawing leads to behavioral abnormalities when compared to control groups.