ontogeny

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Related to ontogenies: ontogenesis

ontogeny

 [on″toj´ĕ-ne]
the complete developmental history of an individual organism. adj., adj ontogenet´ic, ontogen´ic.

on·tog·e·ny

(on-toj'ĕ-nē),
Development of the individual, as distinguished from phylogeny, which is evolutionary development of the species.
Synonym(s): ontogenesis
[G. ōn, being, + genesis, origin]

ontogeny

(ŏn-tŏj′ə-nē)
n. pl. ontoge·nies
The development of an individual organism or a part of an organism from inception to maturity. Also called ontogenesis.

on′to·ge·net′ic (ŏn′tə-jə-nĕt′ĭk), on′to·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
on′to·ge·net′i·cal·ly, on′to·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

ontogeny

The biological history of the development and growth of a single individual or organism. See Phylogeny.

on·tog·e·ny

(on-toj'ĕ-nē)
Development of the individual, as distinguished from phylogeny, which is evolutionary development of the species.
Synonym(s): ontogenesis.
[G. ōn, being, + genesis, origin]

ontogeny

The development of an individual organism of a species from fertilization to maturity.

ontogeny

the whole of the development of an organism from fertilization to the completion of the life history. See HAEKEL'S LAW.

on·tog·e·ny

(on-toj'ĕ-nē)
Development of the individual.
Synonym(s): ontogenesis.
[G. ōn, being, + genesis, origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
Epigenetic processes, when natura non facit saltum becomes a myth, and alternative ontogenies a mechanism of evolution.
Alternative ontogenies and evolution: a farewell to gradualism.
1984) and Carboniferous Pachytesta hexangulata (Stewart 1951) demonstrate that the earliest seed plants had female gametopbytes with ontogenies similar to extant cycads and Ginkgo.
These developmental landmarks represent hypotheses of homologous events or processes in ancestral and derived ontogenies. Although developmental landmarks may be any feature of ontogeny, birth and sexual maturity are often chosen to represent onset ([Alpha]) and offset ([Beta]) events when heterochrony at the level of whole organisms is being studied ("global heterochrony"; Raft and Wray 1989; Hall 1992; Raff 1996).
A repeated measurements ANOVA (SAS 1985) was used to analyze these data for the following sources of variation: (1) Population: (2) Genotype, nested within population; (3) Treatment; (4) Time (total growth); (5) Time by Population (genetic differences in ontogenies between populations); (6) Time by Genotype within population (genetic differences in ontogenies within populations); (7) Treatment by Population; (8) Treatment by Genotype within population; (9) Treatment by Time (plasticity of ontogenetic trajectories); (10) Treatment by Time by Population (genetic variation between populations for plasticity of ontogenies); (11) Treatment by Time by Genotype within population (genetic variation within populations for plasticity of ontogenies); (12) Initial mass; and (13) Block.
In this discussion, I attempt to synthesize the results of these analyses, linking them to the knowledge on growth processes in hemimetabolous insects and to the evolutionary patterns found in a comparison of ontogenies among all six species of the genus Limnoporus (Klingenberg and Spence 1993).
But to undertake a generalized comparison of the ontogenies of the various species, it is necessary to align all the trajectories within a common frame of reference.
Our studies (Li & Johnston, unpubl.) on the development of various floral morphs in Amsinckia spectabilis (Boraginaceae) also indicate that both paedomorphic and peramorphic ontogenies are involved in the derivation of small homostylous flowers from their putative ancestor; namely, populations having large distylous flowers (see section IX.B).
(1979) proposed a framework for analyzing heterochrony by comparing the ontogenies of ancestral and descendant species.
To address the first cirterion of shared patterns of whole plant ontogeny, I compare ontogenies of primary shoots emphasizing the "age" of production of the first carpellate flower, both in terms of time and morphology (i.e., nodal position).