ontogeny

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ontogeny

 [on″toj´ĕ-ne]
the complete developmental history of an individual organism. adj., adj ontogenet´ic, ontogen´ic.

on·tog·e·ny

(on-toj'ĕ-nē),
Development of the individual, as distinguished from phylogeny, which is evolutionary development of the species.
Synonym(s): ontogenesis
[G. ōn, being, + genesis, origin]

ontogeny

/on·tog·e·ny/ (on-toj´ĭ-ne) the complete developmental history of an individual organism.ontogenet´icontogen´ic

ontogeny

(ŏn-tŏj′ə-nē)
n. pl. ontoge·nies
The development of an individual organism or a part of an organism from inception to maturity. Also called ontogenesis.

on′to·ge·net′ic (ŏn′tə-jə-nĕt′ĭk), on′to·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
on′to·ge·net′i·cal·ly, on′to·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

ontogeny

[ontoj′ənē]
Etymology: Gk, ontos, being, genein, to produce
the development of one organism from a single-celled ovum to the time of birth, including all phases of differentiation and growth. Compare phylogeny. See also comparative anatomy.

ontogeny

The biological history of the development and growth of a single individual or organism. See Phylogeny.

on·tog·e·ny

(on-toj'ĕ-nē)
Development of the individual, as distinguished from phylogeny, which is evolutionary development of the species.
Synonym(s): ontogenesis.
[G. ōn, being, + genesis, origin]

ontogeny

The development of an individual organism of a species from fertilization to maturity.

ontogeny

the whole of the development of an organism from fertilization to the completion of the life history. See HAEKEL'S LAW.

ontogeny (än·täˑ·j·nē),

n the developmental history of an organism.

on·tog·e·ny

(on-toj'ĕ-nē)
Development of the individual.
Synonym(s): ontogenesis.
[G. ōn, being, + genesis, origin]

ontogeny (ontoj´ənē),

n the natural life cycle of an individual as contrasted with the natural life cycle of the race (phylogeny). See also life expectancy.

ontogeny

the developmental history of an individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the ontogenic level, students' career passions and clear goals helped them to persevere and overcome personal barriers in the pursuit of their academic and career pathways.
Given that the functional connections among single brain areas respond to a dynamic organization that develop during ontogenic learning (Luria, 1966, 1973), such combinatory capacity is probably facilitated by experience from environment-dependent processes.
The problem is that human adults have not been and could never be subjected to the husbandry regimens found in primate laboratories and, as a consequence, there is a complete confounding of ontogenic and phylogenic influences.
The relationship between HIV/AIDS and certain cancers is not fully understood, but the link is likely related to the immunosuppressant state and the high prevalence of risk factors for cancer development, including, among others, tobacco usage and ontogenic viral coinfection.
Molecular characterization of estrogen receptors 1, 2a, and 2b and their tissue and ontogenic expression profiles in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).
Fiesler, "Comparative bibliography of ontogenic neural networks", in Proceedings of the Internacional Conference on ArtificialNeuralNetworks, 1994.
A new growth model for red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) that accommodates seasonal and ontogenic changes in growth rates.
Skinner's (1981) proposal that behavior is determined by three levels of selection--phylogenic, ontogenic and cultural--did not generate a systematic treatment regarding the third level until 1986, when Sigrid Glenn began to conceptualize and analyze such relations and called them "metacontingencies".
In this study, the following systems were used to develop an association between reports of child physical abuse recurrence: the ontogenic system and the microsystem.
1964) and its ontogenic development and architecture have attained progressive sophistication from the primitive cyclostomes to the higher vertebrates (Good et al.
Authors list 11 potential reasons for taxonomic confusions: (i) an important morphological plasticity, (ii) variable ontogenic forms, (iii) a high polymorphism, (iv) morphological characters which may be absent (eg.