onomatopoiesis

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Related to onomatopoeic: onomatopoetic

on·o·mat·o·poi·e·sis

(on'ō-mat'ō-poy-ē'sis),
The making of a name or word, especially to express or imitate a natural sound (for example, hiss, crash, boom); in psychiatry, the tendency to make new words of this type is said to characterize some people with schizophrenia.
See also: neologism.
[G. onoma, name, + poiēsis, making]

onomatopoiesis

, onomatopoeia (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-poy-ē′sĭs) (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-pē′ă) [Gr. onoma, name + -poiesis, ]
1. The formation of words that imitate the sounds with which they are associated, e.g., hiss, buzz.
2. In psychiatry, imitative words and sounds created by patients with schizophrenia.
onomatopoeiconomatopoietic (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-pē′ik) (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-pō-et′ik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an onomatopoeic expression of segments, phonemes (consonants or vowels), prosodic units (syllables or moras), or the linguistic constituents (words/stems/roots).
a word, often onomatopoeic, which describes a predicate, qualificative or adverb in respect to manner, colour, sound, smell, action, state or intensity.
The onomatopoeic words in Chinese dialects support that [n] should be more original than [j] (the second etymon in Table 4 means 'sound of stone' in Sinitic).
For example, Flyxe (2002) examines the translation of Japanese onomatopoeic and mimetic expressions into Swedish by analyzing the difficulty of the translation and the reasons for their often remaining without translation.
Similarly, the sounds made by Apollinaire's new shoes ('cre cre') the phonograph's scratchiness ('zzz'),and the bus's motor ('rro oo to ro ro ro') correspond to Carra's onomatopoeic 'crucra crucra', 'bree btee', 'cric crac', 'zzzz' and the sounds of various vehicles ('Trrrrrrrrrrrr', traak tatateak') (Bohn.
It's broad Scots, Burnsian Scots, so a lot of them wouldn't have been able to understand it, but it's a very visual show and a lot of Old Scots is very onomatopoeic so you can get the gist of it.
And dark was a necessary condition if I was to succeed in my mission--to hear, on this mid-June, early-evening hike in the southeast section of the Dwarf Pine Plains of Westhampton, the onomatopoeic songs of whip-poor-wills (Caprimulgus vociferus) and chuck-will's-widows (Caprimulgus carolinensis), two of the three species of "goatsuckers" that occur in New York State.
Yiddish may be the most onomatopoeic language ever created.
To add to the fun alliterative sentences and onomatopoeic words like 'honked', 'sneaked' or 'croaked' appear along with the tantalizing 'See you later Alligator'.
The onomatopoeic lyrics of "Oubwa" mimic a ticking "bomb.
Small's response ends up being a sort of composite theory: the sound may be onomatopoeic of the nightingale's song, but only if we consider that the nightingale is simultaneously a woman who has endured all of the grisly horror of Philomena's life.
To listen to his Radio 5 Live weather reports is to be taken back to childhood; with his soft cadence and onomatopoeic inflexion, one could almost be listening to something from Watch With Mother, or Tales From The Riverbank.