onomatopoiesis

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Related to onomatopoeic: onomatopoetic

on·o·mat·o·poi·e·sis

(on'ō-mat'ō-poy-ē'sis),
The making of a name or word, especially to express or imitate a natural sound (for example, hiss, crash, boom); in psychiatry, the tendency to make new words of this type is said to characterize some people with schizophrenia.
See also: neologism.
[G. onoma, name, + poiēsis, making]

onomatopoiesis

, onomatopoeia (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-poy-ē′sĭs) (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-pē′ă) [Gr. onoma, name + -poiesis, ]
1. The formation of words that imitate the sounds with which they are associated, e.g., hiss, buzz.
2. In psychiatry, imitative words and sounds created by patients with schizophrenia.
onomatopoeiconomatopoietic (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-pē′ik) (on″ŏ-mat″ŏ-pō-et′ik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
They did not find this effect on vocabulary growth for onomatopoeic baby talk words.
It is an onomatopoeic expression of segments, phonemes (consonants or vowels), prosodic units (syllables or moras), or the linguistic constituents (words/stems/roots).
Doke describes the ideophone as "A vivid representation of an idea in sound [...] a word, often onomatopoeic, which describes a predicate, qualificative or adverb in respect to manner, colour, sound, smell, action, state or intensity." (Doke 118 as quoted in Voeltz and Kilian-Hatz).
Insightful background information is provided on naming practices that may arise from onomatopoeic or supernatural associations with a creature, or from wordplay around human interactions with types of insects that intrude into people's lives.
The onomatopoeic TV tabloid description of this is: Tadyak!
We see, hear and almost feel the silk taffeta of the dress through Malenfant's smudging of the glowing orange pastel paired with Baldacchino's onomatopoeic description.
The onomatopoeic words in Chinese dialects support that [l] should be more original than [n].
I'm not surprised flip-flops have broken into the fashion scene, but I would have guessed they'd trade in their onomatopoeic name.
Yamaguchi (2003) argues that there are more than 1,200 onomatopoeic and mimetic expressions in Japanese, which is about three times more than in English.
My personal view is that mayim was perhaps derived from the onomatopoeic yam ("lake" or "wide stretch of a river"), connoting the sound of water movement, as the root hmh ("murmur, roar") connotes the noise of waves (Jer.
The three-piece are noted for their spartan sound - the name itself is almost onomatopoeic - and they can seem downbeat at times.