onomatology

(redirected from onomastics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to onomastics: Onomastician

onomatology

 [on″o-mah-tol´ŏ-je]
the science of names and nomenclature.

onomatology

(on?o-ma-tol'o-je) [Gr. onoma, name, + logos, word, reason]
The science of names. Synonym: nomenclature; terminology

onomatology

the science of names and nomenclature.
References in periodicals archive ?
1979) "Mudpies Which Endure: Onomastics as a Tool of Literary Criticism," Literary Onomastics Studies 6: 18.
The necropolis discovered in Sighisoara, at Paraul Hotarului, is an interesting case since it was attributed to Dacians who died during the time of the province until the discovery of funerary stelae whose inscriptions document a population with mix Celtic and Illyrian onomastics (64).
But the surge of popular interest in Jewish onomastics has been largely fueled by the Internet.
This is given explicit and implicit attention in, for instance, many papers from The 21st International Congress of Onomastic Sciences (e.
Whereas the signified of DeLillean names remains irretrievable, authors like Acker and Morrison put onomastics to the service of their specific gender and race agendas.
His publications through the years have revealed his penchant for onomastic and textual criticism and for the Dark Lady motif in Shakespeare's sonnet sequence.
Modern onomastics, however, takes the view that a name is not simply equivalent to the sum of its parts, but mutates at the moment of coinage.
Keywords: onomastics, symbology, gender, subject, criticism
Because queen Medb, the Intoxicating One, appears in other tales as the embodiment of sovereignty; because Donn happens to be the name of the well-known Irish god of the dead; because there is a mighty battle and a bull fight at the end suggestive respectively of the wars of the gods and the cyclical struggles of agricultural divinities found in other Indo-European traditions; and for many more reasons serious and silly, the Tain has been enthusiastically chewed over for more than a century by scholars of mythology, oral literature, linguistics, onomastics, womens studies, and you name it.
Literature in Greek, Syriac, and Arabic, together with inscriptions and geographical onomastics, contribute to assessing the spread of a growing form of piety.
The chapters that follow deal with vocabulary, syntax, onomastics, phonology, English grammar and usage and, finally, literary language.