single-vessel disease

(redirected from one-vessel disease)

single-vessel disease

Coronary heart disease in which one coronary artery has significant narrowing/stenosis. Single-vessel disease can be managed by stenting, angioplasty or coronary artery bypass.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
ACME-1 trial (Angioplasty Compared to MEdicine) was one of the first studies to compare the efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention with medicine alone in patients with stable angina.7 In this study it was known that patients have one-vessel disease and a positive exercise test, and were followed for a total of six months.
The study showed that angioplasty was less effective in controlling sym ptoms in patients with two-vessel disease and stable angina than in those with one-vessel disease.
If there were multiple lesions in the same vessel that was regarded as one-vessel disease. Vessel scoring was also calculated and graded into single double and triple vessel disease.
One-vessel disease was present in 11.1% of nonsmokers, compared with 16.6% and 16.2% of current and past smokers, respectively.
Multiple lesions in the same vessel were regarded as one-vessel disease. Vessel scoring was graded into single, double and triple vessel disease.
In relation to the severity of CAD (expressed as the number of coronary vessels affected by atherosclerotic disease), we divided our population of CAD patients into subjects with one, two, or three-vessel disease; sRAGE did not differ among the three groups: one-vessel disease: 578 (217-962) pg/mL; two-vessels disease: 650 (312-1053) pg/mL; three-vessels disease: 692 (336-1150) pg/mL (P = 0.4).
Considering that those patient groups showed significant differences by means of one-vessel disease (almost half between Group 1 and 4), emergency of revascularization, balloon pump use, mechanical complication rate, need for inotropic support after the operation, interpreting the comparable mortality becomes more difficult even for any of above-mentioned variable.
Each group was further stratified based on disease severity: low (predominantly one-vessel disease), intermediate (predominantly two-vessel disease), and high (primarily three-vessel disease).
tHcy in subjects with three-vessel disease was significantly higher subjects with than one-vessel disease (in-house, P = 0.0004; Abbott IMx, P = 0.0002; Bio-Rad HPLC, P = 0.0001; Bio-Rad EIA, P = 0.007), but not significantly higher than subjects with two-vessel CHD.
Significant predictors of all cardiac events (including revascularization) were one-vessel disease (HR, 3.94), two-vessel disease (HR, 4.82), three-vessel disease (HR, 7.93), left main CAD (HR, 7.92) and number of segments with mixed (HR, 1.40), and calcified (HR, 1.18) plaques, he reported.
Each group was further stratified by severity: low (predominantly one-vessel disease), intermediate (predominantly two-vessel disease), and high (primarily three-vessel disease).