oncogenic HPV

oncogenic HPV

A human papillomavirus–HPV genotype, especially types 16, 18, but also types 31, 33, and 51, which is pathogenically linked to intraepithelial neoplasia–eg, uterine cervix, termed CIN. See CIN, HPV.
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Efficacy of human papillomavirus (HPV) - 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infection and precancer caused by oncogenic HPV types ( PATRICIA ): final analysis of a doubleblind, randomised study in young women.
In addition, oestrogen acts as an anti-apoptotic agent permitting proliferation of cells infected with oncogenic HPV.
In the past two decades, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) strains have been identified as a causative agent in cervical cancer in particular with high grade oncogenic HPV genotypes, such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, along with some other factors predispose women to cancer10,11.
Together, these 7 oncogenic HPV types are responsible for approximately 90% of HPV-related cancers, including cervical, anal, oropharyngeal, vaginal, and vulvar cancer.
The 9-valent vaccine would prevent a broader range of oncogenic HPV types.
Local data from Africa on the relationship between oncogenic HPV types, immune status and cervical preinvasive lesions are also incomplete.
This prospective multicenter study, called IDAHO (Intgration de lADN des HPV Oncognes, or integration of oncogenic HPV DNA), will involve 3,500 patients to be treated at 11 leading French gynecology hospitals.
Although there are approximately a dozen oncogenic HPV types, HPV 16 and 18 are the most common HPV types and are found in approximately 70% of cervical cancers.
If human papillomavirus vaccines could be delivered as one dose, while retaining their efficacy against the most oncogenic HPV types 16 and 18, we could substantially decrease the global burden of cervical cancer, particularly in resource-poor settings where an annual vaccination program might be difficult to sustain.
The bivalent vaccine protects against HPV-16 and -18, the most common oncogenic HPV types, which are responsible for [approximately equal to]70% of HPV-associated cervical cancers and a large proportion of other HPV-related cancers (1).
Although evidence for the efficacy of the HPV vaccines in the prevention of oral infection with oncogenic HPV types is still limited, there is biologic plausibility of potential effectiveness of these vaccines against head and neck cancers (8).