wavelength

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wavelength

 [wāv´length]
the distance between the top of one wave and the identical phase of the succeeding one in the advance of waves of radiant energy.

wave·length (Λ),

(wāv'length),
The distance from one point on a wave (frequently shaped like a sine curve) to the next point in the same phase; that is, from peak to peak or from trough to trough.

wave·length

(λ) (wāv'length)
The distance from one point on a wave (frequently shaped like a sine curve) to the next point in the same phase; i.e., from peak to peak or from trough to trough.

wavelength

the distance between two successive points at which the wave has the same phase. For example, visible light has a wavelength of between 400 nm (violet) to 750 nm (red).

wavelength 

Distance in the direction of propagation of a periodic wave between two successive points at the same position in the wave (e.g. the distance between two crests). Symbol: λ. Note 1: The wavelength in a medium is equal to the wavelength in vacuum divided by the refractive index of the medium. Unless otherwise stated, values of wavelength are generally those in air. The refractive index of standard air (15ºC, 101 325 N/m2) lies between 1.00027 and 1.00029 for visible radiations. Note 2: The reciprocal of the wavelength is called the wave number. Note 3: The wavelength is longer for red light than for blue light. Wavelength λ is equal to
λ = c/v
where c is the velocity of light and v is the frequency of light. (Fig. W1) See fluorescence; infrared; interferometer; light; phase; Bezold-Brücke phenomenon; electromagnetic spectrum; ultraviolet; wave theory.
Fig. W1 Wavelength of light in air and in a medium of refractive index n 1 and n 2 , respectively (λ 2 = λ 1 / n 2 )enlarge picture
Fig. W1 Wavelength of light in air and in a medium of refractive index n1 and n2, respectively (λ2 = λ1/n2)

wave·length

(wāv'length)
The distance from one point on a wave (frequently shaped like a sine curve) to the next point in the same phase; i.e., from peak to peak or from trough to trough.