on board


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on board

Medspeak
The amount of a chemical, therapeutic agent or toxin a patient has in his or her system, as in, “How much X does Mr Smith have on board?”
References in classic literature ?
The mate told him that the captain would be on board in the afternoon, and that he would leave all that till he came.
When those on shore saw the ship actually under way, they embarked with all speed, but had a hard pull of eight miles before they got on board, and then experienced but a grim reception, notwithstanding that they came well laden with the spoils of the chase.
When you come to a frigate, of course, you are more confined; though any reasonable woman may be perfectly happy in one of them; and I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship.
It doesn't matter how you came on board," said Anthony.
It was odious not to be able to worry oneself in comfort on board one's own ship.
In the meantime, it was observed by all on board, that he avoided HER in the most pointed manner, and, for the most part, shut himself up alone in his state-room, where, in fact, he might have been said to live altogether, leaving his wife at full liberty to amuse herself as she thought best, in the public society of the main cabin.
You will find that the attendant has light refreshments on board, sir, if you should be wanting anything," the station-master announced.
He disappeared rather in a panic during a two-days' gale, in which he had the portholes of his cabin battened down, and remained in his cot reading the Washerwoman of Finchley Common, left on board the Ramchunder by the Right Honourable the Lady Emily Hornblower, wife of the Rev.
Passengers can remain on board of the steamer, at all ports, if they desire, without additional expense, and all boating at the expense of the ship.
I had perhaps not known this part, if my curiosity had not led me, the weather being fair and the wind abated, to go on board the ship.
THAT evil influence which carried me first away from my father's house - which hurried me into the wild and indigested notion of raising my fortune, and that impressed those conceits so forcibly upon me as to make me deaf to all good advice, and to the entreaties and even the commands of my father - I say, the same influence, whatever it was, presented the most unfortunate of all enterprises to my view; and I went on board a vessel bound to the coast of Africa; or, as our sailors vulgarly called it, a voyage to Guinea.
He would tell them about the cablegram when they were all on board the train.