omphalocele

(redirected from omphaloceles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

omphalocele

 [om´fah-lo-sēl″]
protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus; see also umbilical hernia.
A large omphalocele with structure and contents of the hernial sac. From Betz et al., 1994.

om·phal·o·cele

(om'fal-ō-sēl, om'fă-lō-), [MIM*310980, MIM*164570]
Congenital herniation of viscera into the base of the umbilical cord, with a covering membranous sac of peritoneum-amnion. The umbilical cord is inserted into the sac here, in contradistinction to its attachment in gastroschisis.
See also: umbilical hernia.
[omphalo- + G. kēlē, hernia]

omphalocele

/om·pha·lo·cele/ (om´fah-lo-sēl″) protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus.

omphalocele

[om′fəlōsēl′]
Etymology: Gk, omphalos + kele, hernia
congenital herniation of intraabdominal viscera through a defect in the abdominal wall around the umbilicus. The defect is usually closed surgically soon after birth. Compare gastroschisis.
enlarge picture
Omphalocele

omphalocele

A congenital periumbilical defect in which loops of small intestine prolapse into a sac covered by peritoneum and amnion.

Mechanism
Caused by a failure of the intestine at 10 weeks of embryonic development (a time when the gut is normally outside the abdomen) to return to the abdominal cavity.

omphalocele

Neonatology A congenital periumbilical defect in which loops of small intestine prolapse into a sac covered by peritoneum and amnion

om·phal·o·cele

(om-fal'ŏ-sēl)
Congenital herniation of viscera into the base of the umbilical cord, with a covering membranous sac of peritoneum-amnion.
See also: umbilical hernia
Synonym(s): exomphalos (3) , exumbilication (3) .
[omphalo- + G. kēlē, hernia]

omphalocele

Herniation of some of the abdominal contents into the umbilical cord.

Omphalocele

A congenital hernia in which a small portion of the fetal abdominal contents, covered by a membrane sac, protrudes into the base of the umbilical cord.
Mentioned in: Prenatal Surgery

omphalocele

protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus.
References in periodicals archive ?
A thin membrane that keeps the organs intact usually covers the omphalocele.
While it is normal for organs to develop outside of the abdomen of the fetus up until the 10th week in utero, an omphalocele might develop if they do not return to the abdomen after that initial period.
Active enlargement of the abdominal cavity: A new method for earlier closure of giant omphalocele and gastroschisis.
The use of Alloderm in the closure of a giant omphalocele.
Autopsy findings (Figure 1B) revealed an omphalocele with herniation of the bowel and liver, a midline sternal defect with ectopia cordis, a right-sided clubfoot, scoliosis, a bilateral cleft lip, and a midline cleft palate.
5-week gestational fetus was alive and had an omphalocele containing herniated bowel and liver (Figure 2) and a sternal defect with ectopia cordis.
There had been antenatal monitoring since the prenatal ultrasound diagnosed an omphalocele, without any other obvious associated anomaly (the caryotype and fetal cardiac ultrasound were normal).
An omphalocele is often described as being giant when the abdominal wall defect size is >5 cm, or when there is more than 50 or 75% of the liver within the sac (Mitanchez et al.
Omphalocele with ruminal fistula: It was seen in 2 male and 2 female calves and occurred subsequent to firing (punctured) into the swelling.
The omphalocele or umbilical hernia was seen more in cow calves as compared to buffalo calves, in present study.
Key Words: omphalocele, non-invasive ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure, Pentalogy of Cantrell, tracheostomy, paediatrics
Omphalocele is one of the most common fetal abdominal wall defects with an estimated incidence of 1 in 6000 live births (1,2).