omphalocele

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omphalocele

 [om´fah-lo-sēl″]
protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus; see also umbilical hernia.
A large omphalocele with structure and contents of the hernial sac. From Betz et al., 1994.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

om·phal·o·cele

(om'fal-ō-sēl, om'fă-lō-), [MIM*310980, MIM*164570]
Congenital herniation of viscera into the base of the umbilical cord, with a covering membranous sac of peritoneum-amnion. The umbilical cord is inserted into the sac here, in contradistinction to its attachment in gastroschisis.
See also: umbilical hernia.
[omphalo- + G. kēlē, hernia]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

omphalocele

A congenital periumbilical defect in which loops of small intestine prolapse into a sac covered by peritoneum and amnion.

Mechanism
Caused by a failure of the intestine at 10 weeks of embryonic development (a time when the gut is normally outside the abdomen) to return to the abdominal cavity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

omphalocele

Neonatology A congenital periumbilical defect in which loops of small intestine prolapse into a sac covered by peritoneum and amnion
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

om·phal·o·cele

(om-fal'ŏ-sēl)
Congenital herniation of viscera into the base of the umbilical cord, with a covering membranous sac of peritoneum-amnion.
See also: umbilical hernia
Synonym(s): exomphalos (3) , exumbilication (3) .
[omphalo- + G. kēlē, hernia]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

omphalocele

Herniation of some of the abdominal contents into the umbilical cord.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Omphalocele

A congenital hernia in which a small portion of the fetal abdominal contents, covered by a membrane sac, protrudes into the base of the umbilical cord.
Mentioned in: Prenatal Surgery
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since Schuster first treated the gastroschisis successfully with staged repair surgery in 1967, staged reduction as early as possible has been recommended in the treatment of children with giant omphaloceles and no capsule rupture (6-9).
The formation of small and giant omphaloceles seems to involve different mechanism [17].
Abdominal wall defects (AWDs) are a complex group of anomalies, and include the common AWDs (gastroschisis and omphalocele) as well as the complex AWDs (body stalk anomaly, abdominoschisis, pentalogy of Cantrell, bladder exstrophy, and cloacal exstrophy).
There had been antenatal monitoring since the prenatal ultrasound diagnosed an omphalocele, without any other obvious associated anomaly (the caryotype and fetal cardiac ultrasound were normal).
Silon as a sac in the treatment of omphalocele and gastroschisis J Ped Surg 1969;4:3.
Gastroschisis and omphalocele in Singapore: a ten-year series from 1993 to 2002.
"Once we heard the word, 'omphalocele,' it was our world," ABC news quoted Davis as saying.
Key Words: omphalocele, non-invasive ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure, Pentalogy of Cantrell, tracheostomy, paediatrics
On ultrasound, the 24-week-gestational-age fetus was noted to have a midline umbilical wall defect with a herniated sac containing the liver and bowel (Figure 1A) with the umbilical cord attached at the apex of the sac, which was suggestive of an omphalocele. The ultrasonographic examination also revealed a sternal defect with ectopia cordis, scoliosis, and clubfoot.
The EEC covers a spectrum with different severity levels, ranging from epispadias (E) representing the mildest form, with lower and upper fissure, to the full picture of classical bladder exstrophy (CEB), and exstrophy of the cloaca (EC)--often also referred to as OEIS (omphalocele, exstrophy, imperforate anus and spinal defects) complex--as the most severe form.
Omphalocele was diagnosed in 3 male and 3 female calves.