omphalitis


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omphalitis

 [om″fah-li´tis]
inflammation of the umbilicus.

om·pha·li·tis

(om'fă-lī'tis),
Inflammation of the umbilicus and surrounding parts.

omphalitis

(1) Bacterial infection of the stump of the umbilical cord, which usually follows cutting the cord with non-sterile instruments, especially in developing countries in a background of compromised immunity.

Agents
Mixed flora—e.g., E coli, K pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and streptococci.

Clinical findings
Stump inflammation, fever, tachycardia, hypotension, jaundice, without antibiotics, and sepsis.

Mortality
10%

(2) A generic term for inflammation of the umbilical region.

omphalitis

Neonatology Umbilical inflammation

om·pha·li·tis

(om'fă-lī'tis)
Inflammation of the umbilicus and surrounding parts.

omphalitis

Inflammation of the umbilicus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The necrotic tissue of the umbilical cord is a potential site for infection1 immediately after birth by bacterial contaminants.2 The umbilical cord is an important bacterial colonization site, which may occasionally lead to neonatal infection such as omphalitis and sepsis.
Usually pervious urachus is accompanied by omphalitis, omphalophlebitis, urachitis and uroperitoneum.
Neonatal Nosocomial Infection Site Distribution Hospital Dr Cesar Cals, January to December, 2003 Localization N Percent Bloodstream infection 221 68.2% With positive cultures 68 20.9% Clinical sepsis 153 47.2% Pneumonia 28 8.6% Omphalitis 14 4.3% Surgical site infection 8 2.4% Impetigo 3 1.2% Others 50 15.4% Total 324 100% Table 3.
80 (8%) babies developed infection of the umbilical cord stump, omphalitis. Majority of these presented on third or fourth day of life as redness and pus accumulated at the site of cord stump.
(23.) Sawardekar KP: Changing spectrum of neonatal omphalitis. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2004; 23:22-6.
Escherichia coli has several virulence attributes which result in variety of diseases in poultry, including salpingities, sinovities, omphalitis, and chronic respiratory disease (Gutierrez et al., 2010).
On overall basis (table 1) IBD 29.22% was found most prevalent disease in broilers followed by Colibacillosis 18.61%, Coccidiosis 17.38%, CRD 17.27%, Enteritis 8.76%, Coryza 2.18%, ND 1.58%, Hydropericardium 1.36% and Omphalitis 1.16%.
They also tend towards having diseases common to the group, such as: omphalitis, wounds from fighting, viral dermatitis, uric gout, nutritional hypoproteinemia, nutritional hyperthyroidism, and general adaptation syndrome (stress) (SARKIS-GONCALVES et al., 2001).
Sometimes the neonate may develop a mild infection (e.g., omphalitis and other skin infections, otitis, or urinary infections), and severe cases have been reported (e.g., pneumonia, sepsis, or meningitis).
Reproductive tract diseases (n = 521) were omphalitis, salpingitis, peritonitis/coelomitis mostly caused by E.
Patients who had abdominal wall defects including omphalitis, omphalocele, gastroschisis, and patent urachus, severe problems including peritonitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, hydrops fetalis, and significant congential anomalies, and those in whom catheters were inadvertently placed in the umbilical artery instead of the umbilical vein were not included in the study.
GSK today announced that it has submitted a regulatory application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for its antiseptic chlorhexidine gel (7.1% chlorhexidine digluconate gel, equivalent to 4% chlorhexidine) for the prevention of umbilical cord infections (omphalitis) in newborn babies.