omnivorous

(redirected from omnivorously)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

omnivorous

 [om-niv´ŏ-rus]
eating both plant and animal foods.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

om·niv·o·rous

(om-niv'ŏ-rŭs),
Living on food of all kinds, on both animal and vegetable food.
[L. omnis, all, + voro, to eat]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

omnivorous

(ŏm-nĭv′ər-əs)
adj.
Eating food of any kind, including animals and plants.

om·niv′o·rous·ly adv.
om·niv′o·rous·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

om·niv·o·rous

(om-niv'ŏ-rŭs)
Living on food of all kinds, on both animal and vegetable food.
[L. omnis, all, + voro, to eat]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

omnivorous

Eating food of both animal and vegetable origin, as in the case of most people.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
briefly for Mencken, read as omnivorously as Mencken and was
He reads omnivorously, although few contemporary works appeal to him and, as in the past, he remains aloof from the Paris literary establishment despite being a member of the Academie Francaise, the only native-born American to be so honored.
The industrial scene becomes a gigantic skin-inflammation (the description reads like a graphic medical text-book) that omnivorously feeds on the fire renewing it.
The first of these journals records the thoughts, feelings and observations of the young Thomas Merton: pre-monastic, wanting to be a priest, the omnivorously curious graduate student in Greenwich Village.
The irony of this tin image in Heart of Darkness is both stronger and more direct than the omnivorously bookish Cunningham allows.
Paulding's almost ideal boyhood was spent in fishing, hunting, and reading omnivorously. At eighteen he worked in a public office with his brother, and there he met fellow New Yorkers <IR> WASHINGTON IRVING </IR> and William Irving.
Yeats's reading of Plato, Plotinus, and the neo-Platonic tradition is scholarship that is omnivorously receptive to charms and spells.
He usually read omnivorously to make a play" Honan's biographical conjectures built on Shakespeare's career--"he could not have worked six months in the theatre without normal pluck and simple, shoulder-shrugging endurance"--are at least not contradicted by evidence, and his picture of Shakespeare--sensitive beneath a stoical exterior, discreet and adaptable, winning when necessary but with an actor's ability to be all things to all people--is vivid and plausible.