omega-3 fatty acid

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omega-3 fatty acid

n.
Any of several polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for human metabolism, have anticoagulant properties, and are found in leafy green vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, and fish such as salmon and mackerel. Increasing dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids can decrease serum concentrations of triglycerides and LDL cholesterol while increasing HDL cholesterol.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

omega-3 fatty acid

, ?-3 fatty acid
Any of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids found in the oils of some saltwater fish, and in canola, flaxseed, walnuts, and some vegetables. These acids include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Alpha-linolenic acid (found in flaxseed and chia) can be metabolically converted to omega-3 fatty acids in the body. People whose diets are rich in omega-3 fatty acids have a reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease. Synonym: n-3 fatty acid
See also: acid
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
“In fact, the original Inuit studies of 1971 offered the first direct evidence of the protective mechanisms of high level omega-3 intake.
The specific omega-3 sources associated with lower risk for broken hips are ALA (alpha-linoleic acid), which comes from plant sources such as flaxseed oil and some nuts, as well as EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), which is found in fatty types of fish.
"In children, long-chain omega-3 can reduce ADHD symptoms like inattention, hyperactivity and impulsive behaviour.
To cater to the growing need of consumers for healthy products, Al Rawabi, after four years of research, launched its Omega-3 fresh milk.
Omega-3 supplements (typically fish oil capsules) did not decrease the risk of heart attack, stroke, or of dying from heart disease.
"These were high-quality studies, but nevertheless, determining the precise effects of omega-3 supplements on memory ability is difficult, and more research is definitely needed," says Olivia Okereke, MD, MS, a physician at MGH's Gerontology Research Unit and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Epidemiology at Harvard Medical School.
The grass consumed by grass-fed cattle is high in omega-3s, thereby ensuring that their meat also has a higher level of omega 3s--this gives it a better ratio of omega-3s to omega-6s.
The brain is made up of 60 percent fat and needs omega-3 to work properly.
New research, undertaken by Omega-3 experts Efalex, shows almost 60 per cent of adults do not know how many portions of fish they should be eating a week.
Turns out it's rich in omega-3s, a fatty acid that research indicates protects your joints and reduces inflammation.
When comparing sources of omega-3, it is important to understand that this class of essential fatty acid comes in different forms.