oligodendroglioma


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oligodendroglioma

 [ol″ĭ-go-den″dro-gli-o´mah]
a neoplasm derived from and composed of oligodendroglia.

ol·i·go·den·dro·gli·o·ma

(ol'i-gō-den'drō-glī-ō'mă),
A relatively rare, relatively slow-growing glioma derived from oligodendrocytes that occurs most frequently in the cerebrum of adult humans; the neoplasm is grossly homogeneous, fairly well circumscribed, moderately firm, and somewhat gritty in consistency with interstitial calcification sufficiently dense so as to be detected by x-ray imaging of the skull. Microscopically, an oligodendroglioma is characterized by numerous small, round or ovoid, oligodendroglial cells with small, deeply stained nuclei (rarely observed in mitosis), and palely stained, indistinct cytoplasm; the neoplastic cells are rather uniformly distributed in a sparse, fibrillary stroma with scattered calcific bodies and an often prominent arcuate vasculature; chemoresponsiveness is associated with loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 1p and 19q.
[oligo- + G. dendron, tree, + glia, + -oma]

ol·i·go·den·dro·gli·o·ma

(ol'i-gō-den'drō-glī-ō'mă)
A rare, slowly growing glioma derived from oligodendrocytes that occurs most frequently in the cerebrum of adults.
[oligo- + G. dendron, tree, + glia, + -oma]

oligodendroglioma

A slowly growing tumour of the nervous system derived from neural connective tissue cells, the oligodendroglial cells. The cells of the tumour are small, well-defined ‘halo cells’ with round nuclei and clear CYTOPLASM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffuse glial tumors of the central nervous system are classified by the World Health Organization as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas according to histological findings (1).
Oligodendrogliomas are common intra-axial primary brain tumours, and carry special significance due to several key features, which when present provide better prognosis compared to other intra-axial tumours.
Documenting chromosomal arms 1p and 19q codeletion is currently required to establish the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma. The most frequently used technique is FISH, in which the codeletion status is inferred based on the probes used to cover a short segment of each of the chromosomal arms, 1p and 19q.
Perry, "Clinicopathologic aspects of 1p/19q loss and the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma," Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, vol.
Both primary tumors (medulloblastoma, ependymoma, glioblastoma, and oligodendroglioma) and secondary tumors (e.g., lymphoma and breast cancer) may spread through the subarachnoid space.
GBM-Os resemble GBMs but also contain areas resembling oligodendroglioma, whereas GBM-PNETs are rare tumors with the combined features of high-grade glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors.
The 1p/19q codeletion is a typical characteristic in 40%-90% of oligodendroglioma [107].
Expression of 7SL was found near normal level in oligodendroglioma and oligoastrocytoma, but underexpressed in astrocytoma, primary, and secondary GBMs.
Some research finds that the DEGs are regulated by transcription factors in glioblastoma [35] and microarray technology has been used to identify the DEGs and their functions in the development of three types of glioma (astrocytoma, glioblastoma, and oligodendroglioma) [36].
LGG could be further classified into astrocytomas, oligodendroglioma, and oligodendrocytes astrocytoma based on pathological type.
The patient's father was submitted to a total thyroidectomy for multinodular goiter at age 23 and died at 60 years old of brain tumor (anaplastic oligodendroglioma).