olfactory lobe


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Related to olfactory lobe: bulbus olfactorius

olfactory lobe

n.
A projection of the lower anterior portion of each cerebral hemisphere, functioning in the sense of smell.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

olfactory lobe

The olfactory bulb and tract. Synonym: rhinencephalon
See: olfactory nerve for illus
See also: lobe
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

olfactory lobe

a projection of the frontal lobe of a cerebral hemisphere that is well-developed in most vertebrates, but reduced in humans, from which arises the olfactory nerve. It is associated with the sense of smell.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Ventral view of the brain: A= cerebrum, B= optic lobe, D= medulla oblongata 1= rostral cerebral pole, 2= caudal cerebral pole, 3= olfactory lobe, 4= paramedian eminence, 5= ventral longitudinal fissure, 6= olfactory nerve, 7= optic nerve, 8= optic chiasm, 9= optic tracts, 10= infundibulum, 11= hypophysis, 12= oculomotor nerve, 13= trochlear nerve, 14= trigeminal nerve, 15= midbrain 16= pons, 17= ventral medullary fissure.
The olfactory neurons that innervate aesthetascs follow the "aesthetasc pathway"; they terminate on the glomeruli composing the paired olfactory lobes of the brain (OL).
The connections between the olfactory receptors on the external structures and the olfactory lobes within the brain are structurally simple and are modest in number of neurons (Sandeman and Sandeman, 1991).
Abbreviations: AL, accessory lobe; OL, olfactory lobe; ORN, olfactory receptor neuron; LAN, lateral antennular neuropil.
However, it is striking that presumptive neurogenesis of local interneurons of the olfactory deutocerebrum appears to be restricted to species with accessory lobes [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 7 OMITTED] - that is, glomerular neuropils of the deutocerebrum connected to the olfactory lobes (Schmidt and Ache, 1997) - whereas neurogenesis of neurons residing in the HBC occurs only in species in which the accessory lobes are thought to be reduced secondarily (Scholtz and Richter, 1995; Sandeman et al., 1993).
Though their brains are smaller than a human's, dogs have 25 times more smell receptors, and their olfactory lobes are four times bigger.
These sensory neuropils include olfactory lobes (OLs), which receive input from aesthetasc chemoreceptors (Mellon and Munger, 1990; Sandeman et al., 1992; Schmidt and Ache, 1996b); lateral antennular neuropils (LANs), which are thought to receive input from non-aesthetasc chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors on both lateral and medial antennular flagella (Schmidt et al., 1992; Schmidt and Ache, 1996a; Roye et al., 2000); and median antennular neuropils (MANs), wh ich receive projections from statocysts, equilibrium receptors, and receptors from the antennular proximal segments (Sandeman et al., 1992; Schmidt et al., 1992; Schmidt and Ache, 1993, 1996a; Cate and Roye, 1997).