olestra


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olestra

(ō-lĕs′trə)
n.
A calorie-free fat substitute synthesized from sucrose and vegetable oil for use in snacks such as potato chips, and capable of passing through the body without being digested.

Olestra

a trade name for a synthetic fat substitute derived from sucrose and eight acids of vegetable oils. Olestra adds no calories or fats to the food into which it is incorporated. Because the molecules of Olestra are larger and more tightly packed than those of ordinary fats, they cannot be broken down by digestive enzymes and cannot enter the bloodstream. Adverse effects reported include cramping and loose stools in some people and inhibition of absorption of some vitamins. A newer formulation is fortified with certain fat-soluble vitamins.

Olestra

A proprietary, FDA-approved synthetic (no-calorie) fat used in savory snack foods—e.g., tortilla chips, potato chips and crackers.  Olestra has an appearance, taste and texture virtually identical to fat, but unlike most dietary fats (which are composed of three fatty acids linked to a glycerol), it is composed of sixt to eight fatty acids linked to glucose and is too large for digestion by the body’s enzymes. Olestra may reduce passive over-consumption as it flows undigested through the GI tract. A one-ounce bag of potato chips fried in olestra has 70 calories; a bag fried in regular fat has 150 calories.

olestra

Sucrose polyester, Olean® A proprietary synthetic–no-calorie fat, approved by the FDA–for use in savory snack foods–eg, tortilla chips, potato chips, and crackers; Side effects GI discomfort including cramps, diarrhea; it binds to vitamins A, D, E, and K, and carotenoids. See Obesity.

o·les·tra

(ō-les'tră)
A fat substitute that is stable for frying, but that also prevents fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins from being absorbed. Some adverse effects have been reported.

olestra

A non-digestible fat substitute that was given approval by the US Food and Drug Administation (FDA) in 1996 but which does not appear to be the final solution to the obesity problem. About 20 per cent of those eating it are said to have abdominal symptoms such as cramping or diarrhoea. There is also concern that Olestra might inhibit the absorption of fat-soluble antioxidant carotenoids.
References in periodicals archive ?
As if that wasn't bad enough, another problem with olestra is that it blocks the absorption of ALL fats including vitamins A, E, and K.
Principal investigator Ronald Jandacek, PhD, an adjunct professor in the department of pathology and laboratory medicine at UC's College of Medicine, said that the findings showed that the rate of PCB disappearance from the participants that ate olestra was markedly faster during the one-year trial than that before the trial.
It sounds like a snake oil pitch," admits chemist Ronald Jandacek, an adjunct professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine who once worked for olestra developer Procter & Gamble.
His attempt to impugn olestra by noting that Stephen Glass once defended it suggests that logic is not his forte either.
Foods that contain the zero-calorie fat substitute olestra no longer have to include a label warning consumers about possible abdominal cramping and loose stools, the Food and Drug Administration said.
The Food & Drug Administration will no longer require companies that sell snacks and other foods containing the controversial fat substitute olestra to warn that it can cause cramping and other digestive problems.
Procter & Gamble, for example, used a panel of technologists, including academics and representatives of small technical firms, to generate new applications for its Olestra molecule.
By some accounts, Procter & Gamble's fat substitute olestra (brand name Olean) (1) is a dangerous food additive that can "cause diarrhea and cramps and that can increase your risk of heart disease, cancer, and blindness" (Jacobson, 1998, p.
The ultimate example of food marketing has to be Olestra, the
By people who have eaten products made with Olestra.
Mole Nip To Peter Huber, author of Hard Green: Saving the Environment From the Environmentalists -- A Conservative Manifesto (Basic Books), for the following ringing declaration: "Cut down the last redwood for chopsticks, harpoon the last blue whale for sushi, and the additional mouths fed will nourish additional human brains, which will soon invent ways to replace blubber with olestra and pine with plastic.