margarine

(redirected from oleomargarine)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

margarine

Butter substitute made from refined vegetable oils or a combination of vegetable oils and fats. Coloring material and vitamins A and D are added. It contains 9 kcal/g.
References in periodicals archive ?
19 Autumn 2001): 3-15; "How Oleomargarine Bill was Passed," Creamery Journal, vol.
Mayer, an industry executive and past president of the Institute of American Meat Packers, pointed out that in addition to familiar animal by-products, such as leather, wool, soap, and oleomargarine, new discoveries utilizing animal by-products in the pharmaceutical field were being made almost every year: "What is the value to humanity of such products as pepsin, adrenaline, pituitrin, ovarian extract, pineal extract, insulin and liver extract?
In 1902, Congress amended the 1886 statute to raise the excise on colored oleomargarine from two to ten cents per pound.
30) There the Court, by a vote of 6-3, upheld a statute that imposed a tax at a rate of one-fourth of a cent per pound on uncolored oleomargarine, but at a rate of ten cents per pound where the oleomargarine was colored to resemble butter.
t]he advocates of this proposed legislation admit that their object is to place the tax on oleomargarine so high that it can not be placed upon the markets of the country if colored.
After all, as some pointed out, the oleomargarine tax imposed a levy on colored oleomargarine forty times the tax on uncolored oleomargarine, and that exaction was nevertheless a tax rather than a penalty.
388) Similarly, Taft had argued, the oleomargarine law upheld in McCray did not "'show on its face,'" as did the Child Labor Tax, "'the detailed specifications of a regulation of a state concern and business with a heavy exaction to promote the efficacy of such regulation.
422 In the case of employing child labor or manufacturing colored oleomargarine, for example, a law-abiding rational taxpayer weighs the benefits of engaging in the enterprise against the tax costs of doing so.
432) This formulation makes the tax sound rather simple, like a tax on coloring oleomargarine, or taking bets, or selling opium.
United States and the Oleomargarine Tax of 1902, 5 J.