margarine

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margarine

Butter substitute made from refined vegetable oils or a combination of vegetable oils and fats. Coloring material and vitamins A and D are added. It contains 9 kcal/g.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ford, (185) the taxpayer was indicted for violating section 6 because he failed to mark containers of oleomargarine as required by Treasury Regulations.
Beyond the scope of this short article, we can observe oleomargarine sitting in this exceptional space while finally wending its way to ubiquitous acceptance around the time the Foreign Trade Zone act of 1934 (FTZs) put whole areas within U.
19 Autumn 2001): 3-15; "How Oleomargarine Bill was Passed," Creamery Journal, vol.
The speaker referred to laws prohibiting sale of yellow-colored oleo, even though it was plainly labeled as oleomargarine.
The earpet underneath was a thick tar of oleomargarine and syrup and half a century of melted Jujubes.
United States (1904), in which the Supreme Court upheld a prohibitive federal tax on artificially colored oleomargarine.
678 (1888), in which the Court upheld a prohibition on the sale of oleomargarine because the prohibition was a good faith effort "to protect the public health and to prevent the adulteration of dairy products," 127 U.
1950 The Oleomargarine Act requires prominent labeling of colored oleomargarine to distinguish it from butter.
Pennsylvania (1888) he sustained a state law which prohibited the sale of oleomargarine.
Pegram tells the story of public policy confrontations over colored oleomargarine, factory regulation, home rule for Chicago, public schools and public transportation, and constitutional and legislative reforms.
For instance, discriminatory taxes or outright bans were placed on oleomargarine and compound lard, as well as certain kinds of baking powder, milk, whiskey, coffee, candy, and drugs, which were claimed by competitors to be adulterated.
The Court refused to inquire into the motives of Congress when it imposed a tax of ten cents per pound on oleomargarine artificially colored to imitate butter and only one-fourth cent per pound on uncolored margarine.