oleate

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oleate

 [o´le-āt]
1. a salt or ester of oleic acid.
2. a solution of an alkaloid or other basic drug in oleic acid.

o·le·ate

(ō'lē-āt),
1. A salt of oleic acid.
2. A pharmacopeial preparation consisting of a combination or solution of an alkaloid or metallic base in oleic acid, used as an inunction.

o·le·ate

(ō'lē-āt)
1. A salt of oleic acid.
2. A pharmacopeial preparation consisting of a combination or solution of an alkaloid or metallic base in oleic acid, used as an inunction.

o·le·ate

(ō'lē-āt)
1. A salt of oleic acid.
2. A pharmacopeial preparation consisting of a combination or solution of an alkaloid or metallic base in oleic acid, used as an inunction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, two microwave samples were prepared under selected conditions as follows: a mixture containing 0.15 g of solid iron oleate, 0.76 g of oleic acid, and 8.32 ml of dibenzyl ether (MwE8) or benzyl alcohol (MwA8) was stirred at 600 rpm, while the temperature increases at 3.75[degrees] C/min until 250[degrees] C and then was maintained at this temperature for 1 hour.
The core size and shape of nanoparticles were measured by transmission electron microscopy, where a drop of toluene, in the case of the oleate precursor, or water, in the case of the nanoparticles, was placed on a carbon coated copper grid, allowing all the solvent to evaporate at room temperature.
The advantages of having a solid precursor in comparison to a liquid oleate are numerous: first of all, its reproducibility, scalability, easy purification by precipitation, high stability over time, and finally its ease to weight in comparison to the standard liquid oleate, which is a highly viscous plastic fluid; secondly, the solid oleate presents distinctive characteristics in comparison to the liquid oleate such as a higher Fe content as determined by TG (33 wt% Fe in the solid oleate-Fe against 6 wt% in the liquid iron oleate, Figure 1(c)) and different iron-oleic acid coordination.
The parameters chosen as default are iron concentration of 4 mg Fe/ml, molar ratio (oleic/Fe) of 5, heating ramp of 3.75[degrees]C/min until 250[degrees]C, kept for 1 hour at this temperature, and solid iron oleate as iron precursor.
GC-MS trace (total ion chromatogram) of the methylated fatty acid composition of the solid iron oleate (A) and liquid iron oleate (B).
The presence of oleate at concentrations up to double the albumin concentration had no significant effect on the increased free fraction of furosemide caused by CMPF binding.
To elucidate the role of CMPF on the complicated inhibition behaviors on furosemide binding observed in serum containing oleate, furosemide, and CMPF, we examined the influence of oleate on the binding of CMPF to serum protein.
Like oleate, qualitatively similar effects on the furosemide binding in the presence of CMPF were observed for both linoleate and stearate (Fig.
For this reason, we also examined the effect of unsaturated fatty acid (oleate), polyunsaturated fatty acid (linoleate), and saturated fatty acid (stearate) on the binding of furosemide to serum in the presence of CMPF.